I Want Someone to Write a Book about My Life

i want someone to write a book about my life

Dear Friendly Ghostwriter, I want someone to write a book about my life, because I’ve experienced so much, and I feel others could benefit. There have been a lot of ups and downs, but I’ve come through and have a good life now. People are always telling me that I should write a book, so I’m reaching out to you. I don’t have the time and frankly, don’t have the experience needed. I need help!

Each week, I get at least three letters that paraphrase this sentiment. There are variations to this request, but the plea is basically the same. Help, help, I want someone to write my book!

I hear you!

I’m here to help.

I can’t always respond to everyone who writes, but here are a few ways you can be sure to catch my attention.

Have an uplifting angle

Trust me, no one wants to read a book about how horrible a life has been. While the story could be completely true, it will make reader feel awful (and sometimes squeamish). In addition, there will be no progression of the characters, which makes the book flat and boring.

Personally, I will only write meaningful stories, with good, uplifting endings. There is plenty of bad news in the world; I don’t need to add to it. It’s very rewarding for me when a reader walks away from reading a book I wrote with a new positive outlook and fresh approach to life.

I’ve ghostwritten a few books about the Holocaust, because I feel the survival stories are each important to share. I spoke to a woman the other day, who lives her life every day feeling grateful for being alive. She feels the weight of responsibility to make good decisions that help others. Shouldn’t we all feel that?

Research my website

I love it when authors write me and have done their homework. They have reviewed my website and want to hire me because they like how I write. I’ve written over a hundred blog articles, so if you want to get a feel for my writing style, my website is a great place to start.

I’ve also written over two dozen books, but unfortunately, you can’t read them. That’s because I always sign a confidentiality agreement with each client. After all, when you hire me, you’ll be the author and once we’re done, I’ll just be a ghost.

Still, I have two books that bear my name. Check them out. You don’t have to purchase them but can see a preview on Amazon. Yes, each client has a unique written voice, but it’s always wise to do a little research and become familiar with your ghostwriter’s writing skills.

Know what I charge

Take a moment and review my pricing. If you do, and I’m within your range, let me know. It saves us a lot of time. If you can’t afford me, but have a budget, be upfront about that. I can sometimes help you work something out with another writer.

I charge $50,000 for a 200-page (50,000 word) book. That works out to a dollar per word, so if you have a smaller budget, I can write a shorter book. Mini-eBooks are popular on Amazon, so that’s always an option.

Please understand that no matter how compelling your book is, I am not able to write it for free. It takes hundreds of hours to write a book!

I love working with new authors but am very selective about the books I write and the people I write with. My clients become my partners for the period we work together and most become good friends. It’s a special relationship, one I cherish.

What To Expect When Hiring A Ghostwriter

Photo by Simson Petrol on Unsplash

I’ve been ghostwriting for over fifteen years now. I tackle fiction, business books and memoirs and strive to always capture my client’s unique voice with every word. There really isn’t any genre that I can’t write for another author.

Having said that, I’m incredibly picky about the clients and the subject matter I take on. Why? Because I’m tied closely to that person and project for a long while. A book often takes a year to eighteen months to write, and my clients often become fast friends.

Who typically hires a ghostwriter?

When someone reaches out to me asking for help with their book, I can tell that they often have no idea what to expect when hiring a ghostwriter. I understand, as mine isn’t a common vocation. In fact, most people I speak to about my profession seem surprised to learn that people will actually hire someone else to write a book for them (then put their own name on that book). It’s done more often that many seem to realize and is completely ethical.

It’s not just the celebrities and politicians who reach out to hire a ghostwriter these days. Quite a few people hire me to write their life story simply to share their adventure with their descendants. In addition, many professionals seek out a professional writer who can put in the time and energy to put their vision on the page or bring their story to life. After all, it does take hundreds of hours to write a book. How many CEOs, visionaries, and entrepreneurs have that sort of spare time on their hands? And if they do, my bet is that they’d rather devote the weekends and evenings to their families and friends. Maybe travel a bit. Take on a new hobby.

What’s the cost?

No doubt about it, hiring a ghostwriter is an investment. I charge $25,000 per 100 pages. That’s about a dollar per word. While that might seem pricey, some ghostwriters run a quarter of a million dollars or more.

Plan to put 25% down and pay the rest as the book unfolds. Never ask a ghostwriter to accept a deferred payment; they could never run a business that way.

Who gets the credit?

Most often, the ghostwriter never receives any credit. We sign a Nondisclosure Agreement (NDA), swearing secrecy for the project. Now and then it might be in the best interests of the author to give the ghostwriter a writing credit (such as a “with” or a “as told to” tag on the cover). And some gracious clients will give a kind acknowledgment in the back of the book, thanking the writer for their assistance. I am always tremendously grateful for such a gift. However, I personally never expect a credit and am happy to remain the invisible ghost for the book.

How does it work?

My clients really become new writing partners. Most will provide me with a lot of notes, which will help me form a good outline. Then we’ll chat on the phone until I have all the information I need. Each client is different, because each author has a unique story to tell and everyone has their own style. Some clients require hours of conversation, while others have very cohesive notes right from the start. The process is almost always different with each person.

What is the process?

I’d say that the process can be broken up into three phases:

  • The Research Phase: It’s hard to write a book without all the information upfront, so I like to dive in and immerse myself in the content before I begin writing. I’ll tell you, it’s the most time-consuming part of the process. Once I have everything I need, I’ll write up an outline for the client. This will act as our road map for us for the entire process.
  • The First Draft Phase: Once the outline is approved, I’ll write the first draft. I always send bits and pieces as I write the book, getting feedback and approval along the way. Not every ghostwriter works this way, but I find it’s a must for me. I wouldn’t want to finish the book only to realize I’d misunderstood a key element from the beginning.
  • The Editing Phase: After the first draft is approved by the client, I begin editing. I normally hire one or two editors to review the manuscript after I finish working and re-working it. The client is rarely involved in this stage as I would have already received all the feedback and comments in the previous phase.

Hiring a ghostwriter makes writing a book simple and easy. However, I should warn you, it does require some time investment on the part of the author. Still, we’re taking dozens of hours rather than hundreds. Plan to spend a few hours a week answering questions and reviewing pages. Most clients find the process rewarding and, in the end, they always have a book with their name on it.

To learn more about the cost of hiring a ghostwriter, please read my article, “How Much Does It Cost To Hire A Ghostwriter?

Writing a Book: Your First Few Steps

Congratulations!

I’m thrilled that you made the momentous decision to complete that book that you’ve been thinking about writing for years! Bravo! That’s the first step. Now let’s tackle the next few.

I’m not here to tell you that writing a book can be made simple through a few steps. No, it will take time and patience. There is no way to even pen a short book in a few weeks. However, with a few preliminary steps I’d like to try to cut down on potential frustration!

Sum up your book in just a few lines

Before you can really start even outlining your book, you need to answer this fundamental question in a few lines: “What is your story about?” Then see if you can boil it down to a single line, a single breath. For example: This is a story about a young man, who rose from extreme poverty to become a successful entrepreneur. You know what the book is about, don’t you?

Why is this important? It keeps you on track. Plus, the themes, messages, and purposes of the book come out quickly from this simple one-line statement. It also keeps you from traveling down a divergent path. For instance, you might be tempted to devote three chapters of your business memoir to a failed marriage, designed to help budding entrepreneurs. Perhaps you’re hoping to get in a few good digs along the way. Well, that doesn’t really match your original concept, does it? So, toss it.

However, delving into an early business failure could definitely help your readers avoid the same pitfalls. Those stories would definitely be good to tell and would be important to your story.

Assignment: Write a one- to three-line summary of your story, answering the question, “What is your story about?”

What’s your purpose?

Why are you interested in writing your book? What do you hope your reader will gain from reading it?

As I’ve written a few times in my blog, if your purpose is to get back at someone, think again. That story just isn’t something worth reading. Another purpose that rarely works is financial. If you’re looking to make a million off of your story, and that is your primary goal, it won’t come out right.

By defining your purpose, you can help yourself stay on track. When you get into outlining, you can make sure that each scene, each segment aligns with that purpose fully. And if you find yourself straying, you can toss the paragraphs into a roaring proverbial bonfire.

Assignment: Write down your purpose(s) in writing your book.

What are your messages?

It’s good to work out what messages you wish to impart to your reader early in the process. This will help you sort through all the information you’ll gather later, in order to figure out what will make the cut. It will also help you find your writing voice and determine how you want to tell your story (or share your wisdom).

For instance, one of your messages for your memoir might be about the value of perseverance. Another message could center around the importance of ethical behavior in business. So, the individual stories that will make up the book should center around these themes.

Assignment: Write down the messages you wish to impart to your reader.

Once you’ve finished these steps, you’ll be ready to start collecting notes, which you’ll use to create an outline. That will be the subject for the next blog article! Let me know how you did with the assignments above in the comment section below!

If you decide you wish to hire a ghostwriter, please contact me. I’d like to help. And if you wish to learn about my pricing, please check out my article on the subject!

Thank you and keep writing!

If you liked this article, here are a few additional ones you might find helpful:

Questions for a Ghostwriter

A Ghostwriter’s Fee: How Do They Charge?

Working With A Ghostwriter – What Steps Should You Take?

Calling All Entrepreneurs! Imagine Publishing a Book to Win Clients.

Let me be clear, I adore entrepreneurs.

You are so brilliantly unique and wonderfully essential to our society. We need more of you in our world, continually enriching us with your creativity and productivity.

I’m fully aware that you live and breathe your product or service. You give of yourself wholeheartedly and rarely live by the clock, because you love what you do.

After talking to many self-created business owners, I understand the challenge involved with building a client base. There are many techniques, but success always seems to boil down to entering the tricky world of sales.

Let’s be real, what entrepreneur can make a living while attempting to elude sales?

It’s safe to say that you must bite the bullet and embrace the inner salesman within you.

Now, please don’t get me wrong. I’m not taking about becoming a greedy, aggressive, pushy person who tries to force things on people they don’t honestly need. No, I’m talking about honing the intricate art of interesting people in the product or service that you provide.

That’s where ghostwriters come in.

That’s where I come in.

How many potential clients could you interest if you authored a well-written book about your niche-market expertise?

“Well, Mrs. Prospect, funny you should ask. The fact is, I wrote the book on that subject!”

There are only a few things that impress people more than this. And it holds true for so many types of business. Whether you’re selling gluten-free cupcakes or specializing in commercial real estate, do you agree that you can draw in more clients if you’re a published author on the subject?

Chances are, if you are a successful entrepreneur, you could write this book yourself. You have the necessary talent and creative ability, but let’s be realistic…

Do you have the time to write your book yourself?

Writing a book takes hundreds of hours. That’s why most successful entrepreneurs find it cost effective to hire a ghostwriter.

The next question becomes: Am I able to afford to hire a professional writer?

Only you can answer that question!

Basically, as with any business decision, it comes down to finances.

The first step, the first calculation, involves figuring out how many new clients you’ll receive when you author a book. If you hand your book to a prospect, they’re more likely to become a client. Bottom line, you’re certain to gain credibility and earn respect, which should translate to new business.

I’m not here to talk you into this idea, but if you’ve read this far, you must like the concept.

The next step is to calculate what sort of income you can expect from those new clients. Don’t forget to factor in your expenses associated with this new business. Let’s keep it real and be conservative.

Now balance that with the cost of hiring a ghostwriter, $40,000 for a 200-page book. Plan for the project to take you a year or more to complete then add in another six months to a year to publish and market your work. Give yourself time. It’s not an overnight process.

If you’re ahead financially after five years, is that a promising investment for you?

If not, consider writing a shorter book. Most ghostwriters charge by the word, so that will cut down on costs.

So, what did you decide?

If you’ve determined it is a wise business plan to reach out and hire a ghostwriter, please email me. I’m interested in hearing from you, learning about your project. Please include your budget and time line, so that I can fully understand your needs.

Invest in yourself and others will be more likely to invest in you!

 

Writers, Please Put off Procrastinating Promptly!

I speak to potential authors every day. So many people have a dream to become a published writer. More than not, they are passionate about their books, but ultimately decide to put off starting their projects.

Why?

The list of reasons is endless. The content of the excuses is unique to the writer, but themes are usually frighteningly similar. Too busy, too broke, too preoccupied with some facet of life…

One for one, the clients who hire me to ghostwrite for them are the ones who make a firm decision and don’t let the quirky whims of life sway them. Take charge people end up with a published book in their hands.

After all, I take the hard work off their plates, as well as the hundreds of hours it takes to complete a well-written book. I only really need my clients to spare an hour or two a week to help me complete their project. Sometimes less.

Don’t get me wrong, the reasons not to write a book might be quite valid. If you don’t have a story to tell, wisdom to share, or a passion to help others, it’s probably best not to embark on a writing adventure. Complaining about how unfair life has been to you will never make a good book. Sorry.

However, if you have a good idea and have been stewing over your book for the last year, it’s probably time to do something about it. Or have you been pondering your book concept for two, three…ten years? Come on, when will be the right time?

If you think about your future book on a regular basis, but haven’t taken the first step, please stop procrastinating immediately and do something to further this important long-term goal. If you have a reasonable budget and are ready to start, feel free to contact me. Just to warn you, I’m often booked, but if the project is enticing enough, I might be able to squeeze you in. I’m an outside-the-box thinker and am here to help. If I’m not the best writer for you, I’ll do my best to find someone who is.

I want to help you finish your book!

Whatever you do, don’t sit for a minute longer and carefully consider the wisdom of taking a tentative step forward. Leap, my friend! Leap into the wonderful world of creativity and become a published author!

Additional articles you might find helpful:

How Much Does It Cost To Hire A Ghostwriter?

Should I Write and Publish My Memoir?

Questions for a Ghostwriter

It’s Good Business to Write a Book!

Four Different Ghostwriting Methods

Why You Should Become an Author

After talking to many people, it seems clear that most want to write at least one book within their lifetime. It makes sense! For some, it’s a burning passion that can only be satisfied by completing the goal. Just thinking about the idea or being stuck in the middle of a book project is very unfulfilling, isn’t it?

Most people don’t desire to write a book because they crave fame and fortune. Instead, it’s more like they have something important to say and want to share that message with an audience, whether it be their memoir, useful information in their particular field, or a just fantastical story. Many people have a communication they wish heard.

However, while most everyone has something to say, many don’t have the time or skills necessary to put a book together.

That’s where I come in. As a ghostwriter, it’s my job to do what I can to help.

I speak from experience when I say that you will gain a sense of pride and self-confidence that’s unparalleled when you publish your first book. There’s nothing like seeing your name in print and getting reviews of praise from readers.

If you decide to tackle your book project yourself, my advice is to write from the heart and focus on helping others through your message. Your book will stay with readers long after they’ve finished it, influencing their lives and the lives of those they talk to about your book.

Perhaps you’ve already started on your book, but haven’t been able to finish it due to time constraints or writer’s block. Whatever the reason, don’t give up! You’ll run the risk of leaving an important life goal hanging in limbo, not to mention all the lives that could have been influenced through your message.

If you’re reading my blog, you’re most likely one of the many people who yearn to see their words in print, to see their name on a book cover. If so, then I urge you to find a way to complete your book. Too many people let the dream of being an author go unfulfilled.

I’ve ghostwritten nearly twenty books and have personally authored one, Chess Is Child’s Play – Teaching Techniques That Work. When I receive notes from readers about my book, it brightens my day tremendously. There’s nothing else like it! It’s wonderfully rewarding.

Whether you’re just getting started or already several chapters deep, if you find yourself stuck, let me know! I’d like to help in any way I can, be it offering writing tips and tricks, helping with self-publishing, editing or proofreading, or taking on your book project to free up your time. I have a large network of talented writers, editors, and proofreaders and can help find the perfect match for you.

Feel free to email me any time. I’m here to help!

Additional articles you might find helpful:

How Much Does It Cost To Hire A Ghostwriter?

Should I Write and Publish My Memoir?

Questions for a Ghostwriter

It’s Good Business to Write a Book!

Four Different Ghostwriting Methods

Why Do You Want to Write Your Book?

write your bookCongratulations! You’ve made a decision that you want to finally write your book you started years ago. That’s a huge step, one that should be applauded.

Many people never get there. They sit on an idea, dreaming about how nice it would be to have a book with their name on it, but they don’t take the steps to see it through.

I get a few calls a day from prospective clients. When they contact me for a quote, I like to interview them a bit. One of my first questions is “What is your primary goal in writing this book?”

Here are some answers I love to hear:

  • “I really want to inspire others with my story.”
  • “I want to document my life story for my family to pass down through the generations.”
  • “I’ve been working on this book for years and just need help completing it.”
  • “I am passionate about helping others.”
  • “I have knowledge in a niche area that no one else has. I want to share it!”

These are the clients that I look for, the ones I am eager to help. They are often passionate people with message-driven stories or insightful nonfiction books. I want to assist them in achieving their goals!

I would say that most people who call me, asking for my ghostwriting services have very different responses to my question. I should warn you that when I hear these answers, I can immediately tell me that it won’t be a good match:

  • “I really want to get back at my ex with this book.”
  • “I was terribly abused as a child and adult, and want to share my story.”
  • “I want to make a million dollars in the first year.”

No one wants to read a book that is viciously attacking an individual or group, where the author is obviously carrying out a vendetta. Remember, whenever you put something in writing, it’s there forever, in print.

Likewise, people also don’t want to read about how someone was molested as a child, lost their parents to cancer, only to marry an abusive alcoholic who murdered their favorite pet. (Believe it or not, I get many emails from people with a similar story.)

As for the last reason, let’s talk about money.

It’s fine if you want to make a profit with your book. For some, it’s very realistic. However, you must understand that you will need to sell your book. Tossing a book up on amazon.com in the hopes that many will miraculously find it and buy it will lead to disappointment.

So, what is your goal for your book? Let me know, I’d love to hear about it!

Additional articles you might find helpful:

It’s Good Business to Write a Book

How Much Does It Cost To Hire A Ghostwriter?

What Do I Need to Start with a Ghostwriter?

A Ghostwriter’s Fee: How Do They Charge?

Eight Reasons Why You Should Write a Book

When You Shouldn’t Write Your Memoir

Woman_with_a_rough_life_checking_herself_out_in_the_mirror_(8436629921)Are you debating whether or not to write your life story? You’re not alone. I have had quite a few clients who have waffled over the same dilemma. And more often than not, I will advise people to go ahead and write down the chronological details of their past, if only for their immediate family. Recording your personal history for your children, and your children’s children, is a wonderful gift.

However, there are times when I would say you shouldn’t write your memoir. Here are a few examples that I have encountered this past year:

“I’ve lived a horrible life.” This might surprise you, but I get a ton of memoir requests from people who have lived a life of misery and despair. For instance, their childhood might have been filled with abuse then they later married another abuser, continuing the pattern. When I ask them about the purpose of their book, they usually say that it shows how one can live through anything.

While this may be a decent message for some, it isn’t really one to hammer into those who are trying to better their lives. It’s true that not every story has to have a happy ending, but most stories, particularly the memorable ones, inspire us. And it’s hard to be inspired when you’re reading such a depressing story. Most people would have no interest in picking and reading up such a book.

“I just can’t remember much.” A few times this year I received requests to write a book from people who truly can’t remember many details or stories from their past. Typically, when I interview a client I can help them remember things they never thought they could. However, if you aren’t able to remember much, it will be hard to put together your life story.

“I can’t write and I don’t have any money to hire a writer.” This is another popular comment. Though I’m not sure, I suspect these folks want me to offer to write their book for free (or for a percentage of the profits). Unfortunately, not everyone is completely upfront about their situation and will sometimes pretend they are shopping for a ghostwriter, even if they don’t ever plan to hire one. If you can’t write and can’t afford to hire someone to write it for you, your book won’t get written.

“I’d really like to get back at so-and-so.” Ah, revenge is a dish best served cold, right? Remember, though, that when you put things in writing, they are pretty permanent. You can’t take it back. It’s out there for all eternity for many readers to review over and over again. Writing a book to hurt someone else, even if you feel it is justified, is a bad idea.

“My family and close friends would kill me.” Surprisingly, this is a common fear. When I talk to most client prospects to give them advice and learn more about their projects, quite a few people have mentioned that they’re worried about hurting the feelings of loved ones. It’s a very valid concern, one that should be taken seriously. For as I mentioned earlier, once it’s in writing, it’s permanent.

As a ghostwriter, I can hide the identity of most people in your life through pseudonyms, but I can’t hide Momma or that eccentric uncle. Those close to you will know whom you’re talking about and they might not like what you have to say.

“I’ve lived a boring life, except for this one incident.” If you had, say, a near death experience, it might have been very exciting and worthy of a short story or newspaper feature article. However, if the rest of your life was relatively normal, or “boring,” most likely that one event won’t make for a good memoir.

“I don’t want everyone to know what happened to me.” Writing a memoir is like putting your personal life on display for all to see. If you are concerned about others knowing what happened to you, it’s probably not a good idea to write a book. However, I have clients who write their memoir not for the whole world to read, but rather just for their family. If even that bothers you then, well, I’m not sure what to tell you. The only way around it would be to fictionalize your story, but then it wouldn’t really be a memoir, and there’s a good chance your family and close friends would still guess that it has something to do with you.

Most of the time I encourage people to write their book, because I do feel people often have a book or two within them. However, sometimes one must be a bit flexible about the subject matter. Perhaps it isn’t your life story that you should write about, but rather a how-to book about your niche area of expertise or a science fiction novel. Whatever the case may be, I’m here to help.

Additional articles you might find helpful:

Seven Tips For Writing A Great Memoir

Why Should I Hire a Ghostwriter?

A Ghostwriter’s Fee: How Do They Charge?

Working With A Ghostwriter – What Steps Should You Take?

How Much Does It Cost To Hire A Ghostwriter?

Would You Like to Write a Business Book?

Daintree_National_ParkAre you sitting on the fence, wondering if you should write a business book? Most likely you’d have a lot to say about your field. Perhaps you could even make a difference for others. However, I get it, your hesitation. It takes time and money to write a book.

You’re successful because you consistently put many hours into your business, every day, every week. More than likely you don’t take many vacations and you probably rarely get eig
ht hours of sleep. And if you’re anything like me, you laugh at the concept of working nine to five.

Am I right?

Okay, you don’t have a lot of spare time, but there’s no getting around the fact that you’re sitting on information that others need. Most likely you’ve created a niche market in your industry, and figured things out that others just haven’t.

So, then, when you retire, who will learn what you know? How will you pass on your knowledge? If you don’t write a book, and share your knowledge, the next generation will flounder in that particular area.

Successful business people who have specialized knowledge definitely have a responsibility to record their information, so that others can benefit. You can’t let your knowledge die with you. It just isn’t right.

When my husband and I visited the rainforest many years ago in Queensland, Australia, we took a number of guided tours. I was struck by the abundant life that grew all around us. It was thrilling! And I was particularly fascinated by the culture and knowledge of the aboriginal people. They could heal the body of most ills with the plants they found growing in the rainforest.

One tour guide told me that he was able to learn a lot from the aboriginals, but that they wouldn’t share everything with outsiders. Although I could understand their viewpoint, and respected it, I still felt sad to know that certain medicinal remedies would be lost forever as a result.

The same could be true for your business, your specialized knowledge. So, why should you share it? Why do you have an obligation to our children’s children? These are questions you really can only answer for yourself.

Still, allow me to offer some other compelling arguments to consider. For instance, wouldn’t you like to be a published author in your field? It gives you undeniable credibility with your clients and peers, not to mention, it’s a great feeling to say, “I wrote the book on that subject!”

I’m going to go out on a limb and guess that you really do want to write your book, that you do understand the urgency to share your information with others. You most likely find an indescribable joy in helping others and would like to take the next step toward seeing your book in your peers’ hands.

And I’m here to help!

However, keep in mind that come January 1st, many people will be writing me, asking for help with their books. I think writing a book is probably a top priority on many peoples’ New Year’s resolutions lists!

So, write me now and we can talk about what you need to do to write your business book!

Additional articles you might find helpful:

How Much Does It Cost To Hire A Ghostwriter?

Seven Tips For Writing A Great Memoir

Why Should I Hire a Ghostwriter?

A Ghostwriter’s Fee: How Do They Charge?

Working With A Ghostwriter – What Steps Should You Take?