Should I Hire a Ghostwriter?

Should I hire a ghostwriter?

“Should I hire a ghostwriter?” This is a common question. You have a great book idea, but don’t know how to go about writing it. After all, writing a full-length book takes hundreds of hours and a lot of expertise.

After talking to countless prospective clients, I’ve discovered that most people usually have been trying to complete a book concept for months, sometimes years. Some have even been carrying the idea for more than a decade, sometimes their whole life.

Writing a book is often a goal that burns deep within a writer. People ache to hold that completed book in their hands. I can promise you, that desire will not disappear over time. It might just strengthen.

Now, you might be asking yourself, “Why shouldn’t I just write the book myself? Why should I hire a ghostwriter to write it for me?”

Well, if you hire a ghostwriter to write your book, you’ll received quite a few benefits. Some may surprise you. Here are 10 good reasons to hire a ghostwriter:

Hiring a ghostwriter saves you time 

Give an honest look at your life. Do you really have time to write a book right now. What if you give yourself another two weeks to get started? Will that make a difference?

Most of my clients are busy CEOs or successful business men and women. They have trouble carving out a few hours a week to spend time with their family or go out to dinner with friends. It would be impossible to find the hundreds of hours it would take to write a book.

Most likely, if you can’t budget the time to complete your book now, things won’t change.

Many authors hire ghostwriters

Many books that you know and love have been ghostwritten. Check it out on your favorite search engine. You may be surprised!

If you can, look through books at your favorite bookstore. How many mention a writer in the acknowledgment section? Most likely that person was the ghostwriter.

Some people fear that it isn’t quite ethical to hire a ghostwriter. That’s a very personal decision and I wouldn’t presume to advise you on your own moral code. However, it might help you to know that there are many freelance writers out there helping busy successful people find their written voice.

You gain writing experience when you hire a ghostwriter

gain valuable writing experience when you hire a ghostwriterIf you talk to an accomplished writer, you’ll find that they found their voice, their style, after they penned a few hundred thousand words. It takes experience, dedication, and drive.

You may not wish to invest the time required to write your own book. There is nothing wrong with that. You probably have an area of expertise that I couldn’t even begin to touch.

Remember, writing a book isn’t just a matter of collecting the right number of words. You need to follow the basic rules of writing and story telling, so that you can captivate your readers’ interest.

When you work with a ghostwriter, she will teach you her craft. You will learn a lot about writing, which will help you in the future.

Hiring a Ghostwriter Allows You to Avoid Writing about Painful Subjects

So many people write to tell me that they have lived an amazing life, but can’t possibly tackle writing about it because it is too difficult to face on their own.

You may be too close to the subject to be able to write about it. I would guesstimate that three quarters of the people who write to me, asking for help with their book, want to write their life story. Most get very emotional about the subject and can’t write objectively. You are not alone.

Discover new things about yourself

A ghostwriter is trained to interview you, pulling information from the depths of your memory. You may discover new tidbits of information about your past as we progress through your book.

My clients routinely remark, “Wow, I’d completely forgotten all about that!” Their memories of incidents become sharper and they are often very grateful for that side benefit.

You will be an author of a well-written book

A ghostwriter will give you a well-written bookIf you hire a ghostwriter, you’ll receive full credit for your book. You’ll also own all the rights.

You will be able to attend book signings and hand potential clients your book. No one will know that a ghostwriter gave you a helping hand. We all sign confidentiality agreements, making sure your secret is safe.

You get the benefit of a full author’s credit without having to put in the hundreds of hours needed to write a book people won’t want to put down.

A ghostwriter will get the job done efficiently

When you hire a ghostwriter, you’ll be able to get your book written and published quickly. If you wait until the time is right, it could take decades. Or your book will stay within the confines of your mind and never see the light of day.

You should get your book written as soon as possible. Why wait? There is no benefit to holding off, but there is a very real danger that someone else will come up with your idea and write the book themselves.

You will be a published author

Once your book is available to readers, you are a published author in every sense of the word. There is a beautiful sense of accomplishment when you have completed and published a book. No one can ever take that joy away from you.

Imagine seeing your name on the cover of a book at your local bookstore.

Remember, your book will live forever, entertaining and educating your readers throughout future generations. It’s quite an achievement.

It’s rewarding to receive great reviews

A five star review for a book written by a ghostwriter

When you have a well-written book, people will write lovely reviews. This is such a rewarding experience for a new author.

Imagine reading a review about how your book changed someone’s life. What greater feeling is there?

Most authors want to move people with their writing. They wish to help others who are experiencing certain difficulties or facing particular challenges.

You will enjoy the ghostwriting process

The ghostwriting process is a lot of fun. It’s a bit like sitting in the back of a stretch limo with a friendly driver upfront guiding you to your destination.

You’ll enjoy watching the pages of your inspiration unfold before your eyes. Just imagine what it would be like to receive the first chapter of your book in your email’s inbox within a month.

If you’d like to hire me, please contact me today and we’ll chat about your project!

Additional articles you might find helpful:

How Much Does It Cost To Hire A Ghostwriter?

Your Guide to Hiring a Ghostwriter

Great Memoir Themes

How to Find Your Memoir Themes

Finding your memoir theme is a big part of storytelling.Sharing your life story through a memoir is an intimidate and special experience. As you outline your book, you should consider the incidents that will flow together to tell your life story. When you do it well, the memoir themes you wish to weave should pop out nicely.

You might be thinking, “Hey, I’m just writing what happened in my life. Why would my memoir need to have a theme?” Well, the truth is that memoir themes are vital to your story’s success. After all, a memoir is a specialized autobiography and, as such, it must follow the rules of literature.

What is a theme?

Simply put, the theme of a book is the main idea that ties everything together. This idea might express a basic universal truth, such as Love, Compassion, Tolerance, War, or Loyalty.

These general themes can be further refined to explore a specific aspect. For instance, in Romeo and Juliet, Shakespeare broke down the idea of “Love” and particularly examined forbidden love and its potential consequences.

A theme can also delve into a deeper concept, such as the battle between good and evil. For example, A Song of Ice and Fire by George R. R. Martin explores many shades of good and evil throughout.

The theme is usually not stated outright. You never want to bonk the readers over their heads with your theme. Instead, the author gives the reader insight into his view of the world and the human condition through the characters’ beliefs, actions, experiences and conversations.

How do themes relate to memoirs?

When you write your memoir, you’re not just publishing a shopping list of memories. You are telling the story of pivotal moments in your life, of the lessons you’ve learned that make you who you are.

To capture your readers’ interest, you will need to share these incidents in the most interesting way possible, highlighting key events (creating action) and the people who influenced you most (who become characters in your book).

So, your memoir must follow the same rules as any good piece of literature: you must be able to tie the threads of your story tapestry together with a compelling theme.

How do I find my memoir themes?

Memoir theme of achieving life goal

If you’re struggling to find a good theme, check out my detailed article: Tips To Find Your Memoir Theme. To summarize, here are some key ideas you can explore:

  1. Look over your life story. Were there any obstacles you overcame? What lessons did you learn along the way? Jot these down, and they might point you in the direction of one or two memoir themes.
  2. Summarize your story in one or two sentences. When you drill down to the core of what your story is about, the theme often reveals itself.
  3. Step back and look at the big picture. Ask yourself questions such as “Why did I make that choice?” or “What would I do differently now that I know what I know today?” These questions could help you formulate your memoir themes.
  4. Talk to someone who knows your story. Since she has an outside perspective, she may spot similarities to unify your message.

I was working with a client who had an oppressive influence as a child. She hadn’t recognized it prior to our conversation, but when the stories started flooding out, she realized that an old schoolteacher wasn’t the hero she remembered him to be. One theme that came from these discussions is how one can overcome childhood adversities to become a success.

So, what are some good themes for your memoir? Well, let’s start with some examples of great memoir themes that I’ve encountered in my two decades as a ghostwriter. Maybe a few will resonate with you. Feel free to make adjustments to make them work for your story.

Persistence always wins in the end

If you’ve lived a hard life, one with lots of obstacles to overcome, this can be a great theme if you’ve triumphed. Others will benefit greatly from your story, perhaps finding the strength to pull themselves out of their current hardship.

Note: If you’re still amid the battle and really don’t have anything positive to share, now isn’t the time to write. And if your real goal is to complain to your reader, your story won’t make for a good read. I mean, would you want to read a book like that?

Continual courage can lead to victory

We have all experienced battles where the odds seemed against us. It’s what you do at those moments that counts and can make for a good story. If your life is filled with examples of courage and integrity, that would be a great theme.

I’ve ghostwritten many books with this theme. In fact, three different clients came to me with stories of escaping communism and fascism in bold and daring ways. We can all learn from their bravery.

Family is important

Family is important is a great themeThis is a simple theme, but a good one. In this day and age, where the media reports that most marriages fail and children are growing up without the support and love of their parents, a good memoir showing the beautiful bond of family is a needed commodity. Of course, this theme can go beyond the traditional family structure. If you’ve experienced success and happiness in a non-traditional setting, this can truly inspire others in a similar situation.

Then there is always a need for good advice. Especially in the field of parenting. If you’ve evolved a unique approach that had positive results, you will have an interested audience.

Simply recording your family history for future generations is also a great concept! This is a popular request of a ghostwriter.

Ethical people lead better lives

If your story highlights times when you stood up and did the right thing, even when it was difficult for you, your story can set an important example for others. It isn’t always easy to keep your integrity, especially when peers are pressuring you to do the opposite.

Writing a book that shows how you succeeded by being ethical can help others make similar choices in their own lives. Perhaps someone will pick up your book when he’s at an important crossroad in his life and just needs a gentle nudge to make the right decision.

Crime doesn’t pay

Over the years I have received a number of requests from former inmates who are eager to share their stories of reform. The ones who are passionate about this subject, who regularly go out and speak to young adults, can do well with a complementary memoir.

A memoir from a former inmate will be rough in places and won’t always be happy-go-lucky, but the lessons learned by someone who has traveled the wrong path can be helpful to others. This theme only works if the author is presently leading a successful and ethical life.

Being true to oneself brings rewards

integrity is a good memoir theme

In a world of peer pressure and a constant demand to conform, it can be hard to find one’s way. Influencers from all corners of the globe (or perhaps just down the street) loudly proclaim their “truths” and harass anyone who doesn’t agree. If you’ve remained true to your beliefs despite pressure to surrender, your courage can be a beacon for others to do the same.

For example, many young artists are guided away from their passions by people around them. The ones who have weathered the critics around them and have succeeded beyond anyone’s wildest expectations may instill hope in others undergoing a similar struggle.

Some people have had a difficult decision to make in life and chose an unconventional route. Those authors could motivate others to consider alternative ways as well.

I ghostwrote a book about a woman whose young son had horrible symptoms. She defied her doctors by doing independent research and discovered the true nature of her son’s illness, thus saving him. This story continues to inspire parents all over the globe struggling with a similar problem.

Journeying outside of one’s comfort zone expands horizons

Journeying outside your comfort zone is a great memoir theme

So many people have well-established routines that ultimately don’t do much to fulfill their true life goals. I think most people have a vague awareness that things could be different, could be better, but have no idea how to implement the changes required to make a difference.

If you’ve broken the bonds and found new vistas of joy and fulfillment, your journey could encourage others to take their own leaps of faith.

This journey could be literal. Perhaps the author traveled to a different country and immersed himself in its culture, thereby gaining a broader understanding of what others have to endure to survive and a deeper appreciation of his own opportunities.

Or perhaps the journey is more figurative, more internal. It may be that the author has overcome a potent fear in order to pursue her dream. Or possibly she’s been able to make a change for the better, improving her moral compass along the way.

Life transitions can bring new experiences and joys

Shakespeare wrote a famous monologue about the seven ages of man, detailing each stage a person transitions through in life, a concept philosophers have been contemplating for eons. Each shift into a new phase of life can be a potent memoir theme.

Some transitions can be joyful, while others are often fraught with difficulties.  How did you approach a shift in life? Did you discover a new method of tackling a transition that could help others?

For example, perhaps when you and your spouse had children while maintaining full time jobs, you discovered some methods to juggle both successfully. Or if you’ve hit retirement early and have started a new business, you can share your successful actions and help others do the same.

As you begin to write your life story, there are so many great and inspiring memoir themes for you to explore. Really, you just need to look at the positive impact your story could have on others and then write it from the heart.

If you’re in the market to hire a ghostwriter, please contact me. I’d love to chat with you about your memoir project!

Additional articles you might find helpful:

My Ghostwriting Process

Interview Questions for a Ghostwriter

Ask a Ghostwriter: How Can you Research a Memoir?

Memoir Mistakes You Should Avoid

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    Is Ghostwriting Ethical?

    Is ghostwriting ethical?I’ve been a ghostwriter for twenty years now and love it. Although I am also a published author, there is something singularly satisfying about helping someone complete a lifelong goal of seeing their book in the hands of enthusiastic readers. However, there is a question that comes up routinely when I mention what I do. People ask, “Is ghostwriting ethical?”

    When it comes to ethics and morals, some things are very cut and dry. No, you shouldn’t steal that candy bar just because you’re hungry and broke. Yes, you should help a friend in need even if it might be inconvenient. Other issues might be less black and white; they become a personal choice. For instance, are white lies acceptable if it avoids hurting someone’s feelings? Some would say yes, while others would disagree vehemently. Still, I think most people have a good barometer for determining right from wrong.

    However, I do get a variety of responses when people hear that I write books for others. Some people wonder if what I do is really OK. Here’s a semi-typical conversation:

    “What do you do?”

    “I’m a ghostwriter. I write books for other people.”

    “So you’re telling me that you write the book, but someone else gets all the credit?”

    At this point I usually give a polite nod. “That’s right.”

    “But how is that fair?”

    “I’m paid upfront for my work. I’m fine with it. Really, I am.”

    “But…is ghostwriting ethical?”

    Now, that’s a good question, one worthy of a blog article.

    Is ghostwriting ethical?

    People wonder if ghostwriting is really ethicalI feel strongly that ghostwriting other people’s books is ethical, or I wouldn’t be in this line of work. The way I see it, I’m helping people achieve their dreams by getting their books published. If they aren’t able to write the book themselves, why not hire someone to help them?

    The exception to this rule is that ghostwriting an academic paper is decidedly unethical. Once in a while I get a PhD student writing in to ask me to write their thesis. I think we can all agree that crosses a very clear line.

    Being completely candid, some writers I know will not work as ghostwriters because they feel it isn’t right. They don’t feel right about giving up all the credit for words they’ve written. And there are authors who will not put their name on a book unless they wrote every word themselves. I admire anyone who sticks with their integrity. For these folks ghostwriting isn’t ethical for them. I always say: Never be swayed by popular opinion. Stick to your guns and decide what is right for you.

    As I said prior, ethics is a personal judgment call. Even though I feel strongly about my opinion, I can also see the other viewpoint. In the end, you must decide if ghostwriting is an ethical choice for you.

    Ghostwriters are everywhere

    Ghostwriters are everywhere. Maybe it would help to know that ghostwriting is a common practice. There are many published authors who had help writing their books. There are tens of thousands of freelance writers, but most don’t make a living ghostwriting books. That’s a more elite group.

    You might be wondering how you can tell if a book is ghostwritten. Well, that’s a little tricky because typically a ghostwriter signs a Non-disclosure agreement. However, if you look through the books at your local bookstore, there are a few indicators that the book was written by a ghost.

    Look to see if there are two authors listed on the cover and one’s name is preceded by “as told to” or “with,” these are both standard ghostwriting credits. Also, flip to the back and look at the Acknowledgment section. Many clients have mentioned me there, thanking me for my help (sometimes even mentioning my company name).

    When you start looking for ghostwriters, you’ll start to see them more and more. It’s a bit like when you become a parent and become aware of all the strollers, car seats, and diaper bags in the world. They were always there, but now that you’re looking for them, they seem to be everywhere.

    Plagiarism isn’t ethical

    Plagiarism is when someone copies someone else’s work, doesn’t give him or her credit, and then tries to pass it off as their own work. This is illegal. It’s a misdemeanor, which can result in fines and possibly jail time. You can’t just steal other people’s work.

    Some people confuse plagiarism and ghostwriting. They are very different, because a ghostwriter is paid to write for an author. The contractual agreement states that the author will own the copyrights for the work at the end of the project.

    Now if a ghostwriter plagiarizes someone else’s work and turns it into the client, that is illegal. This can happen when authors pay ghostwriters very little and give them a miniscule deadline. They think their getting a good deal, but in the end, the author might be the one paying the fine and spending a few months in prison for the crime committed. It’s best to pay professional writers what they are worth.

    Ghostwriting is similar to other industry practices

    If you’re still on the fence and wondering if ghostwriting is ethical, consider that our agreement is not unlike others that exist in other fields. For example, large companies hire employees to write software programs or design equipment for them, asking them to assign the rights to them once the project is complete. The employees don’t usually get to keep the patents; the large corporation does.

    How do you feel about this point? Is it ethical for an author to hire a ghostwriter to write a book for him or her? I’d like to hear your opinion! Please feel free to email me to discuss.

    Additional articles you might find helpful:

    How much does it cost to hire a ghostwriter

    My ghostwriting process

    Your Guide to Hiring a Ghostwriter

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      Find the Best Ghostwriting Method for You

      Find the ghostwriting method that works for you

      If you’re looking to hire a writer, you might be curious about the various options. There are a variety of ghostwriting methods I use when helping someone write a book or a series of articles. I select the process based on what the author needs and how developed his idea might be. After all, in the end, my client is my writing partner, and each relationship is quite different. If you’re interested in hiring me, please pop me an email and tell me which ghostwriting method makes the most sense to you.

      Ghostwriting Method 1: Your ideas, my words

      The most common request I get is to write a book based on a rough sketch or outline of a book concept. The author has ideas, but hasn’t had the time to form the words. After all, writing fifty thousand words is time consuming. It can take over a year.

      In this case, I take all the written material my client has compiled and then I interview him or her. After that phase, I’ll do independent research and write a detailed outline. Once my client approves that, I’ll start writing and send pages as I complete sections.

      Ghostwriting Method 2: Your ideas, your words

      This option is surprisingly rare. Most people who have never written a book don’t know how to structure their ideas or material into a complete manuscript. They also have trouble communicating their thoughts so that others can understand them. And while some are able to write, most don’t have the time, which is why they’ve come to me.

      However, there are times when a client has found the time to write but will submit pages to me to be rewritten. I use their words but restructure the flow and fix any other issues the author has been struggling with.

      Some clients hire me on an hourly basis to be their ghostwriting consultant. They really want to write their own book, but need a friendly safety net. I’m happy to teach them the process and rules of writing, while encouraging them to complete their books.

      Ghostwriting Method 3: My ideas, my words

      This option is also rare, but once in a while a client will give me a broad topic and a few scattered ideas, and asks me to provide all the rest of the material. I know it may sound strange, but if the topic is within my scope, I can write an entire book based on my researched knowledge. A few years ago, a client handed me two pages of notes about his great-great-grandparents journey to America. He wanted a fictionalized account of their possible adventures as they struggled to make it across our great land.

      In this case, the book still belongs to the client. It always belongs to them because it is their concept and therefore they are the author.

      Method 4: Researched ideas, my words

      One common request I get from clients is to write a book or series of articles about a specific non-fiction topic. I often know very little about the subject. Fortunately, it’s extremely easy to do research. You can learn about practically anything these days using the internet.

      I like to ask my clients to provide websites they recommend, so that I follow their philosophy and can work from accurate data on their niche market. Once I have the starting point, it’s easy to navigate through the rest.

       

      I have twenty years of experience working with clients using these four different ghostwriting methods. I’m comfortable with any of them. Some clients hire me for multiple projects, using a variety of methods from one project to the next. If you’d like advice on the best ghostwriting method for you, please don’t hesitate to contact me!

      Additional articles you might find helpful:

      How Much Does It Cost to Hire a Ghostwriter?

      It’s Good Business to Write a Book

      What Is the Difference Between a Ghostwriter, an Editor, a Proofreader, and a Publisher?

      Eight Reasons Why You Should Write a Book

      Your Guide to Hiring a Ghostwriter

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        Write My Book: How Much Does It Cost?

        How much does it cost to write my book“How much would it cost to write my book?”

        That’s a common question, one that I’m always happy to answer when an client interviews me. Direct answers are best, I find. The answer is that I charge a dollar per word to ghostwrite and $145 per hour to consult (and I can get a lot done in one hour).

        I will admit that I really enjoy talking to people about their book concepts. After all, I’ve worked with dozens of clients over the last twenty years and have had the privilege of writing their books with them. It is wonderfully rewarding!

        Some prospective clients have very good ideas and just need help. However, occasionally there are those calls which frustrate me beyond belief. One occurred the other day…

        A little story

        Find the right ghostwriter for youI was right in the middle of the last chapter of a memoir I was ghostwriting for a client when the phone rang. Normally, I don’t like to be interrupted while writing, as it breaks my creative flow, but I worried that it might be a writer with a question, so I picked up.

        “Hello?” I asked.

        “Is this Laura Sherman?” the young woman asked, her voice slightly demanding.

        Oh my… It wasn’t a good start. My parents taught me to identify myself on the phone. I dislike it when people don’t bother to give their name before asking me for mine.

        “Yes, it is,” I said, with a sigh. I wasn’t in the mood to correct her. At least the woman didn’t sound like a telephone solicitor.

        “I want to hire a ghostwriter to write my book, because I just don’t have the time to write it myself.”

        “That makes sense,” I said. She had voiced a common plea. Most of my clients are busy executives, with very little extra time. “And to whom am I speaking?” (hint hint)

        She paused for a moment, probably weighing the pros and cons of telling me her name. “Joyce.” (Okay, that wasn’t really her name, but I’m a ghostwriter, so I can embellish.)

        The interview with Joyce

        “Hello, Joyce,” I said. “What’s your book about?”

        “My life story,” was all she offered. “What’s your ghostwriting process?”

        I gave her a brief overview, explaining how it would probably require a couple dozen interviews, spread out over a ten month period. I explained how it takes a ghostwriter hundreds of hours to write a book. Then she asked a few more questions before she got to the big one.

        “So, how much does it cost to hire a ghostwriter?”

        “Well, that depends. How long will your book be?”

        “About two hundred pages,” she said.

        “That’s a good length. I charge a dollar per word,” I said. “So, I’d charge $50,000. What’s your budget?”

        “I don’t know. I don’t have a lot of money to spend.”

        “Well, how much did you want to spend?”

        “I don’t know, maybe a thousand dollars? I know that probably isn’t enough, right?”

        “No, it isn’t,” I agreed. “Not if you want me to write the book for you. I could coach you on writing your book, but you’d need to write it yourself.”

        “No. I don’t want to do that. I want you to write it,” she said.

        A ghostwriter’s fee

        Desire to write a bookNo one can charge a thousand dollars for ten months work, not even starving ghostwriters. However, I always like to try to help everyone who contacts me.  “Look, I know a few editors who are looking to branch out into writing. If you’re interested in writing a short, one-hundred page book, that price is possible. It’s low, but possible.”

        “I don’t have that kind of money.”

        “Then you’ll probably need to write the book yourself,” I said. “If you did manage to find someone willing to write your book for a thousand dollars, it probably wouldn’t come out well. Then you’d be stuck hiring someone else to rewrite it.”

        Then she asked me about the publishing process. So I gave her a rundown on what an author needs to do to sell a book.

        “I’m not good with computers, so I can’t do any of that,” she said.

        Authors need to learn about marketing

        “You’ll need to learn,” I said. My bluntness sometimes gets me into trouble. However, I find it’s better to be upfront than beat around the bush. “Even if you get a publisher, you’ll need to do your own marketing. That’s part of being an author these days.”

        She didn’t seem very interested in this part of the discussion. “So, how can I find a ghostwriter?”

        “If you’re able to scrape together ten thousand dollars, I can ask around for you.”

        She paused then said, “But that would be for a good writer. What if I just wanted to find a writer who will do it for one thousand dollars?”

        I have to admit I was gobsmacked, as my British friends would say. Finally, I tried to repeat that anyone willing to write a book for a thousand dollars wasn’t someone she’d want to hire, but she cut me off and said, “OK, thank you!” and hung up.

        Moral of the story

        If you’re serious about writing a book, you will find a way. Either hire a good, qualified ghostwriter or make the time to learn how to write a book then write it yourself. If you choose to write your own book, consider hiring me as a consultant. I can help you with outlining, rewrites, dialogue, character arcs, etc.

        Now, if you’ve read this article and you are interested in hiring a ghostwriter, I would love to hear from you.

        If you’re interested in learning more about the writing process, please check out these other blog article topics:

        Character Development

        Your Guide to Hiring a Ghostwriter

        How to Handle Criticism

         


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          Interview Questions For A Ghostwriter

          interview questions for a ghostwriterHiring a ghostwriter is a major undertaking. You are about to enter into a long-term relationship with someone who will step into your shoes and learn to write with your voice. Because writing a book together with a ghostwriter is such a personal journey, it’s important that you compile a good list of interview questions for a ghostwriter to help you find the best match for you.

          I recommend writing down the questions ahead of time; however, as with any great interview, you’ll need to ask follow-up questions on the fly. Make sure to take notes, so that after you’ve spoken to a few writers, you can remember who said what. Notes will also help you formulate follow-up questions.

          Potential interview questions for a ghostwriter

          Through your questions, you should work to determine the experience and ability of each ghostwriter you interview. Here are a few topics you might consider covering:

          The number of books she has written

          Writing a book is not an easy task. There are many steps involved in producing a high-quality product. If your prospective ghostwriter has never written a book, you can expect that she will likely have trouble completing your project.

          Having said that, if you’re on a tight budget, a ghostwriter with no prior experience should give you a great price on your book because she will be eager to fill in her resume. It’s a bit of a gamble for you, but if you check out her writing samples and talk to her extensively, you might find a hidden gem. Make sure to pay her enough so that she can invest the time to deliver a quality manuscript to you.

          A professional ghostwriter will have a few dozen books under her belt. All the same, if a writer has written at least three books, she is experienced enough to help you with your project.

          Testimonials from past clients

          interview questions for a ghostwriter include questions about testimonialsSomeone once told me that what other people say about you counts far more than what you say about yourself. I like that tidbit of advice because it is so very true.

          Any professional freelance writer should have collected quite a few testimonials from prior clients. Now, the only problem is that these will need to be semi-anonymous because all ghostwriters are sworn to secrecy. Even so, an established ghostwriter won’t have any trouble getting a few clients to write a few lines of praise.

          Check out my testimonial page. You’ll see some clients proudly share their name and company name, while others prefer to share only initials. Still, you can see that I have worked with many people over the last twenty years. Make sure your ghostwriter has similar credentials.

          Her writing forte

          Some of the interview questions for a ghostwriter should revolve around what she likes to write. Also ask about her experience. This will help you determine if the ghostwriter is a good match for you.

          A few writers only write fiction. Others love to pen memoirs, while some prefer to stick to small business books.

          Personally, I enjoy writing uplifting stories, helping record a family’s history or compiling educational non-fiction material. I wouldn’t be comfortable writing a memoir centered around abuse; it would be too painful.

          However, I can write a fictional novel, a non-fiction how-to book (sometimes called prescriptive non-fiction), or a memoir. I love all classifications and genres, as long as the overall message is positive.

          Her current schedule

          Scheduling should come up regarding interview questions for a ghostwriterWhen you interview a ghostwriter, ask about his schedule. You need to have some prediction about when he can deliver a finished manuscript to you.

          If the writer you select has a full-time job and is going to try to write your book in his spare time, I’ll tell you right now, that’s a recipe for disaster. You can predict that scheduling conflicts will prevent him from completing your story in a timely manner. Plus, he will be tired after his day job and will have trouble giving you his best effort.

          Find a writer who has the time to work with you. You might also ask him how many projects he has on his plate at the moment. As for me, I’m comfortable working on many projects at the same time and always strive to come in ahead of schedule. However, I’m upfront about the time it takes to write a book. Eight months is a minimum requirement, but some can take up to 18 months. It really depends upon the amount of research required.

          A few additional steps

          Sometimes you might find that you instantly click with a ghostwriter and just know she is perfect for your project. However, there might be times when you’re not as confident and feel like you need more information. That’s understandable. If you have a good first interview with a ghostwriter, but aren’t 100% sure about hiring her, there are a few additional actions you can take.

          Test your writer before hiring her

          test your writer when you ask interview questions for a ghostwriterIt is a good idea to test your top ghostwriting candidates by requesting a sample of their writing. This will allow you to see how you work with them.

          You’ll need to pay for the samples you request. Please never ask a candidate to write for free. No professional ghostwriter should agree to that (if he does, he’s far too desperate, which should be a red flag). However, I highly recommend that you ask her to write a few pages for you—for a fee. Most writers have a per word fee. For instance, I charge a dollar per word. If asked to write a sample, I can produce any length desired.

          Keep in mind that there are about 250 words per page. So, four- to eight- pages is a good-sized sample. This will help you determine the skill of the ghostwriter.

          Yet you are not only checking out the ghostwriter’s ability to write, but evaluating his process as well. How much time does he take to write the piece? Make sure he gives you a deadline. Then observe if he meets it. If he is late (for any reason), know that he will probably be frequently tardy if you hire him.

          How does the writer respond to your feedback? If he bristles at your suggestions, that doesn’t bode well for the future. On the other hand, if he accepts all your suggestions without any discussion, this could be equally problematic.

          A good ghostwriter/client relationship involves a healthy amount of give and take. That’s what will produce the best-possible book. I will always give my clients my honest opinion and thoughts, but in the end, remind them that “you are the boss.”

          Communication is key

          Communication is key

          After you ask your interview questions for a ghostwriter, observe how she handles subsequent communication with you. How quickly does she answer your emails? Does she respond to your texts in a timely manner?

          My policy is to handle all communications within 24 hours. In actuality, I’m much faster. I’ve had a few clients comment on how fast I am. “It’s like you’re sitting there waiting for my email!” Well, no, I’m not. But I do check my email frequently. When I see a client query pop up, I like to handle it quickly.

          Most ghostwriters offer a free consultation. Take them up on that. It’s a great opportunity to get their take on your project. See if you can get them to give you some insight into how they’d tackle the project. How would they approach the opening chapter? For instance, if you’re writing your memoir, I’d advise you not to start with the day you were born. It’s much better to find an exciting incident to begin your book and drop the reader headfirst into that scene!

          Take action to avoid scammers

          It’s unfortunate, but true; there are those who will try to scam you in this industry. Over the years I’ve had many people report being ripped off through Craigslist. That’s why I don’t recommend finding your writer through that source.

          When vetting a writer, try putting her name into a search engine and see what comes up. If she is a successful writer, her books, interviews and articles should pop up. If the proverbial crickets chirp (dead silence), you know she isn’t very well established (or she has chosen to keep off the internet). Most professional writers have their own websites.

          If a ghostwriter asks for the entire fee upfront, she is probably trying to con you. Typically, professional writers will ask for a deposit of 25% to 50%. The rest of the payments should be made as the pages are produced. I ask for 25% at the signing of the contract, then another 25% after the detailed outline is approved. The third installment is due after I complete the first half of the first draft, and the final payment is made when I’ve given the client the completed first draft. After that, I make all the edits (hiring an outside editor) and deliver the final manuscript.

           

          The process of hiring a ghostwriter should be quite enjoyable. If you ask your interview questions for a ghostwriter and bond with her, it bodes well for a successful working relationship. After all, writing a book with a professional can be a fun and fulfilling adventure. Take the time to pick the right writer for you!

          Additional articles you might find helpful:

          Understanding Characters

          How Much Does It Cost to Hire a Ghostwriter

          Write and Publish a Book in 2020

          A ghostwriter’s fee: how do they charge?

          Do you need help writing a book?

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            Write a Memoir Readers Will Want to Read

            write a memoir the right wayPeople from all around the world email me each week with a strong desire to write a memoir. I love these requests! Memoirs and autobiographies are so important as they record a slice of history. As readers, we can all really benefit from these books in so many ways. After all, when we are given the freedom to step into another’s shoes for a few moments, we often comprehend life a little better. I know I learn a lot by reading a good memoir.

            So, how do you go about writing your life story?

            First, understand that a memoir isn’t purely a list of chronological events. I was born… then I ate cereal on the 22nd of September…then I… No, I think we can all agree this is boring and would be a memoir mistake. Yes, you will include dates and it’s best not to jump around the time line like a crazed kangaroo on frosted coco sugar squares, but we need to find the right stories to share.

            Find your purpose to write a memoir

            Find your purpose to write a memoirWhy do you wish to write a memoir?

            Yes, this is important. You must know your purpose and then you must communicate that to your readers.

            Having been a memoir ghostwriter for over twenty years, I can share a few purposes my clients have shared over the years:

            • “I wish to share my story with the next generation.”
            • “I have important information to impart to my readers.”
            • “I have lived a full, rich life and feel others might enjoy reading about it.”
            • “Through perseverance I have succeeded and I feel others can learn from this story.”

            Of course, there are many more, but these give you a few ideas.

            Now, in contrast, here are some examples of bad reasons to write a memoir. In my opinion, these purposes should be avoided at all costs:

            • “I’d really like to get back at so-and-so.”
            • “I want to brag about how great I am.”
            • “I’m angry at the world and I want my readers to know it.”

            Again, these are just a few examples, but you get the idea.

            Your reader will be able to discern your purpose easily, and will throw your book away like a hot potato if they sense your motive is off. You have to be honest with yourself here, as there is no fooling your reader. They’ll know.

            Find the purpose of each scene

            Now that you have your purpose firmly in mind, it’s time to sit down to the first draft. I suggest that you begin by jotting down the summaries of important events that brought you to where you are today. Just a few lines that communicate the incidents to you. Trace your journey through these key incidents, so that you can lay out the breadcrumbs that others may follow.

            As you identify these segments, remember the purpose of the book as well as the scene that you are writing. If you can’t identify a purpose for an incident, toss the scene. Be ruthless about this. Here are a few examples of a good purpose for a scene:

            • Introducing an important character
            • Showing a turning point in some key aspect of your life
            • Demonstrating an error you made
            • Sharing a realization you had

            When done correctly, the various incidents will fit together like an intricate puzzle, a beautiful work of kinetic art. They flow seamlessly. One question that will help you determine whether any particular incident should be included is: Does it help move the story forward? Make sure it does.

            Uncover your themes

            use your senses to write a memoirAs you write the summaries of these scenes down, observe what the emerging themes might be. Consider the lessons you’ve learned, which you wish to impart to your readers. Some examples of powerful and effective messages that I’ve recently seen are:

            • Hard work can overcome many obstacles.
            • Don’t hold on to anger. Forgive.
            • Practical experience is essential for any entrepreneur.
            • Failure is always part of success, if you learn from your mistakes.

            It can take time, but through this process you will discover your messages and write a good memoir.

            Another tip is that you must always write with honesty. Tap into your emotions and communicate them. Use all your senses to describe what occurred for you in the past. That way your reader will feel what you felt. If you do it correctly, your reader will experience your life as if they had been there alongside you.

            Enjoy the process! And if you need help, please don’t hesitate to contact me.

            If you’re interested in hiring a ghostwriter, please check out my book Your Guide to Hiring a Ghostwriter.

            If you liked this article, here are a few additional ones you might find helpful:

            My Ghostwriting Process

            A Ghostwriter’s Fee: How Do They Charge?

            Great Memoir Themes

            How Do You Find A Ghostwriter?

            Looking to hire a ghostwriterSo, you’ve got an epic book idea and you dream of getting it published, but you haven’t been able to find a way to complete it. Do you need help? Hiring a ghostwriter can certainly bring that dream to fruition. But how do you find a ghostwriter? It’s tough to know who to hire, who will be the person to see your project through to the end.

            Just doing a search in Google for the term “ghostwriter” will provide a myriad of results. Many of the companies you’ll find are large firms that subcontract out to thousands of writers. It can be a bit overwhelming if you have no clear plan of action in place. Here are a few tips to help you make sense of it all and find a ghostwriter to be your voice.

            Avoid cheap writers

            There are freelance sites like Fiverr, where you can find someone willing to do the job. They charge much less than the market generally demands. While that might sound appealing, you should be hearing the faint echo of blaring warning sounds. If you know that the average ghostwriter bids $15,000 to $60,000 to write a full length book, and requires six to twelve months to complete the project, it doesn’t make sense for someone to bid $500.

            There’s a reason for the low bid. If you hire someone for a tenth the price, you’ll wind up with a subpar product. Trust me, you will need to rewrite the book once it is delivered. However, at that point you’ll probably be frustrated and will be less likely to continue. Chances are the book will never get written.

            The best strategy is to:

            Establish your budget

            Finding a ghostwriter starts by finding your budget

            Finding a ghostwriter starts by finding your budget. You need to know what you can spend before you start looking.

            Don’t be shy about discussing your budget early on in the conversation with your prospective ghostwriters. I’ve noticed that some authors hesitate to tell me what they want to spend when I consult them. Sometimes they just don’t know.

            If you only have a few thousand dollars, you’ll need to write the book yourself and hire an editor. Editors range from $1,000 – $5,000, depending upon what kind of editor you hire. Check out my article: Different Kinds of Editors to learn more about this area.

            If you only have a few hundred dollars, you can hire a writing consultant by the hour. If you need a consultant, please feel free to contact me.

            Know your budget before you begin your search to find a ghostwriter.

            Check work samples

            If you have a budget to hire a ghostwriter, it’s time to do a little research. Be sure to check their work samples and any books they may have published ahead of time. Do this prior to contacting them if possible.

            There is no better indicator of the type of work someone can produce for you than the work they have already published. Professional writers have varying styles. Find a writer who writes in a style you and your readers would enjoy reading. If you don’t like the writer’s samples, chances are you won’t like how they tackle your book.

            Establish a rapport

            Once you get through the initial stages of research and are drawn to a particular ghostwriter, take the time to talk to her. The writing process is a very bonding experience. Most likely, you’ll be immediately drawn to the right writer. If not, keep looking.

            Remember you will work closely with this ghostwriter for the next year or so. If you’re writing a memoir, you’ll need to open up to her and share very intimate details. If you don’t have a strong rapport right from the start, the book will reflect that.

            Start now

            Find a ghostwriter and start now!Once you find the right writer, start immediately. Don’t put it off.

            It’s been my experience that whenever a client puts off a project too long, the project never gets completed. It is rare that someone postpones for more than a month and then does what is required to publish a book. Keep in mind that it will take about a year to write your book and then another few months to self-publish it. When you consider that, now is a good time to start!

            Finding a quality ghostwriter to deliver your book doesn’t have to be a haunting, I mean daunting task (a little friendly ghost humor). I am always happy to answer all of your questions and give you advice about the ghostwriting process.

            Additional articles you might find helpful:

            How To Write A Nonfiction Book

            How Much Does It Cost To Hire A Ghostwriter?

            Your Guide to Hiring a Ghostwriter

            Family History Books Are Valuable

            Record your family historyMany people desire to record their family’s history. If you feel strongly about this, I recommend that you appoint someone to be the family historian. That person must record the stories of the individual family members and relay them to the future generations so they can learn and grow from the experiences of their ancestors. We all benefit from our family history.

            When we uncover how our family struggled through hardships to get where they are today, when we really understand their viewpoints, it often answers questions we’ve asked ourselves about them, such as why grandpa responds the way he does or what makes Great Aunt Trudy hold onto certain idiosyncrasies. In addition, this knowledge can also explain our roles in our family and community.

            There are many different ways you can preserve family memories. If you have zillions of photographs, perhaps a scrapbook format would work. Some people build and bury a time capsule. Others gather all the recipes handed down through the generations and create a cookbook.

            Now, if your family’s story is an action-packed adventure tale, a book is the only way to truly do it justice. I know that writing a book can be quite an undertaking, but it is the surest way to immortalize your family story for the millennia to come. And this is where I come in. When you need help to write your family history in book form, call on me, your friendly ghostwriter.

            Here are some tips to you get started.

            How to format a family history book

            If you’ve decided to write your family history, you might not know where to begin. After all, you have generations of memories and anecdotes to choose from. The first step will be to determine the focus of the book.

            Will it center around one ancestor sharing his or her story?

            Or will it detail a single event that influenced the course of the entire family?

            Or perhaps you want to share multiple viewpoints of a generation that set the stage for the present-day condition of your family.

            Once you decide on the focus, the next decision is easier: the type of book to write. No matter which focus you choose, there are really only two main formats open to you:

              • Memoir
              • Narrative

            Memoir format

            Family history in a memoir formatIf the story highlights one individual sharing an exciting adventure from the annals of her past, you’ll want to choose a memoir format. While other important people will be featured in your book, the story will be told through that one family member’s eyes. It will give the reader insight into her unique viewpoint.

            I must say, by far the most common request I receive is to write a memoir. Each book is so different, because each client has his or her own voice, message, and purpose for writing their book.

            For instance, one book I wrote a couple of years ago featured a young Jewish girl who needed to separate from her family in Europe and pretend to be a devout Catholic to escape the Nazis. Although the experiences of her brothers and sisters are shared throughout the book, they were told through the eyes of the preteen.

            Tip: If you write a book in a memoir format, it will need to be written in the first person. This means that the main character will need to be present in each scene. After all, she couldn’t have experienced the incident if she wasn’t there.

            Narrative format

            If your family story is more of an ensemble piece, with many different people all playing an equal role, I’d suggest you stick with a narrative format. That way you can pick and choose the stories and people to focus on.

            For example, I wrote a story for an author who escaped communist Hungary on foot with his family. Since he was a toddler at the time of the Hungarian Revolution, it didn’t make sense to write it as a memoir. Instead, the story revolved around his parents and older sister, but included him throughout.

            Tip: When using a narrative format, you’ll write the book in the third person. Since you’ve chosen this format because you have multiple stories to tell, I’d recommend a multiple third person limited viewpoint (where you alternate between the viewpoints of different characters from segment to segment).

            The goals of a family history book

            If you find you need help and approach me to write your family history, I will start by giving you an introductory interview. One of my first tasks will be to get your true motivation behind the book project so that I can help you achieve your goals. After all, when I can truly understand my clients’ goals, their objectives become mine and we are able to form a writing team.

            Over the years, clients who approach me to write their family’s story, have two main purposes in mind:

                • To share their story with readers around the world
                • To write a book so their children’s children will know what happened

             

            write your family history for the future generationsI’ve worked with both goals and love to help families record their history. I am so grateful when I’m allowed into a client’s inner circle to learn their secrets and stories and get to record them for future generations—children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren. It is an honor to become a family’s historian. It’s an important role, one that I cherish.

            It might surprise you to learn that some clients hire me and have no intention of ever publishing their book. For instance, you might ask me to write your family history simply because you are afraid that your ancestors’ memories and the lessons they learned will get lost over time, especially after they pass on. Perhaps you want your future family members to never forget the events of the past.

            This is a valid concern.

            One advantage of working with a ghostwriter to write your family history is that you leave the door open to publishing the book, if you choose to do so at a later time. After all, goals and purposes can change. When you work with a professional writer, you can be certain that you’ll wind up with a marketable manuscript which follows all the rules of literature.

            Appoint a family historian

            I would be honored if you considered hiring me to be your family historian. However, I recognize that not everyone can afford the fee. In that case, I recommend appointing a family member to write your family history and become your family historian.

            Find someone who is eager to embrace the events of the past. She will need to be patient and willing to wade through records and documents and be able to organize all the information. In addition, she should be an excellent communicator, who is willing to interview every family member and dig deep to uncover all the pertinent facts and memories.

            Here are a couple tips to help your family historian write your book:

            Tip #1: Capture a person’s exact words

            It is important that you capture each person’s exact words. After all, each member of your family will have a different way of expressing himself. Jot down any idioms the family member might use.

            Never correct his or her grammar. You aren’t a seventh grade English teacher. If Grandpa says, “ain’t,” keep it that way. It’s real and it’s part of what makes him Grandpa, right? Keeping his dialogue intact will allow future generations a better sense of who he was. Record exactly what each person says as they say it.

            In addition, make a note of their mannerisms so you can use these when you describe your family members in your book.

            Tip #2: Collect more information than you’ll use

            Collecting information for your bookWhen you write your book, plan to collect twice the material than you think you’ll use. It’s a bit like carving a work of art from stone. You need to start with a huge block of marble. Then you chip away at it until you uncover your sculpture within. With a book, you’ll need pages and pages of notes detailing adventures, challenges, life lessons, observations and the like. Within these pages you will find the golden nuggets that will help you write your family history.

            Tip #3: Be open to learning new things about your family

            While on this journey you will likely discover that your elders have lived through some amazing times. Some children have no idea what adventurous lives their ancestors have lived, or the hardships they endured. Perhaps your great uncle was a flying ace who engaged in dog fights during World War I. Or, it’s possible that you never knew that your grandmother escaped a brutal dictator on foot with her valuables sewn into her skirt. Or maybe various family members traveled to a variety of exotic locations and never told you. Whatever the case, you’re bound to learn a lot about your family members when you write your family history. Ask questions and be willing to take the book in new directions.

            Tip #4: Select your theme

            As with any memoir or story, your book will need to have one or more main themes. The theme you choose depends on the message you wish to communicate. There is no right or wrong answer here.

            A few powerful themes you might consider are:

              • Drive and determination can overcome obstacles
              • Families can come in many shapes and sizes
              • Sometimes the only way to survive is to fight back
              • Be grateful for everything you have in life
              • Never give up, no matter how painful the odds and opposition might be

            Tip #5: Use your senses

            Now that you’ve determined the theme for your book, you will probably find yourself approaching it from multiple angles. Not only will you have a variety of viewpoints to share, but through the multi-generational events, you can show your theme using all the senses and perceptions available to each character.

            For instance, I wrote the memoir of a man who grew up in a small one-room hovel without running water and electricity before achieving great wealth. To this day, he remains humble and is grateful for the simple pleasures of that early lifestyle, as well as the loving upbringing his parents provided. Together, he and I brought the conditions to life by not only describing the vistas but giving texture to the mud walls and sharing the tastes of his mother’s simple, but delicious cooking. Later, when his mother and father visited his mansion in California, the readers experienced the contrasting luxury along with his parents.

            Note: The theme of gratitude was consistent throughout the book.

             

            So, when should you start?

            Now!

            I mean it!

            Time isn’t always on your side, especially if members of your family are getting on in years. So now is the perfect opportunity to talk with them. Go for it! And have fun!

            If you need help, feel free to contact me. I’d love to help you write your family history! Check out a few of my testimonials.

            Additional articles you might find helpful:

            A Ghostwriter’s Fee: How Is It Charged?

            How Can You Research a Memoir?

            Your Guide to Hiring a Ghostwriter

            Let me know how I can help you!

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              Entrepreneurs Can Be Great Authors

              entrepreneurs can be great authorsIf you’re an entrepreneur, it makes good business sense to write a book. You have a lot to share with others and can really make a difference in the world by doing so. Entrepreneurs can be great authors.

              I have a special spot in my heart from entrepreneurs. If you are one, know that I believe that you are so brilliantly unique and wonderfully essential to our society. We need more of you in our world, continually enriching us with your creativity and productivity.

              I’m fully aware that you live and breathe your product or service. You give of yourself wholeheartedly and rarely live by the clock, because you love what you do.

              After talking to many self-created business owners, I understand the challenge involved with building a client base. There are many techniques, but success always seems to boil down to entering the tricky world of sales.

              Entrepreneurs and sales

              Let’s be real, what entrepreneur can make a living while attempting to elude sales? That’s just not possible. Any business owner must learn how to sell the product of service of their company.

              It’s safe to say that you must bite the bullet and embrace the inner salesman within you.

              Now, please don’t get me wrong. I’m not taking about becoming a greedy, aggressive, pushy person who tries to force things on people they don’t honestly need. No, I’m talking about honing the intricate art of interesting people in the product or service that you provide. It’s just good business sense.

              A book could probably help you sell whatever you produce.

              That’s where ghostwriters come in.

              That’s where I come in.

              How many potential clients could you interest if you authored a well-written book about your niche-market expertise?

              Be recognized as an expert

              Be great authors and be recognized“Well, Mrs. Prospect, funny you should ask. The fact is, I wrote the book on that subject!”

              There are only a few things that impress people more than this statement. And it holds true for so many types of business. Whether you’re selling gluten-free cupcakes or specializing in commercial real estate, you can draw in more clients if you publish a book on your niche subject.

              Chances are, if you are successful, you could write this book yourself. As I keep saying to all you entrepreneurs out there, you can be great authors. You have the necessary talent and creative ability. However, let’s be realistic…

              Entrepreneurs can be great authors, but rarely have time

              Writing a book takes hundreds of hours. That’s why most successful entrepreneurs find it cost effective to hire a ghostwriter.

              The next question becomes: Am I able to afford to hire a professional writer?

              Only you can answer that question!

              Basically, as with any business decision, it comes down to finances.

              The first step, the first calculation, involves figuring out how many new clients you’ll receive when you author a book. If you hand your book to a prospect, think about the future sales. They are much more likely to become a client of yours, because you’ve gained credibility and earned their respect, which should translate to new business.

              I’m not here to talk you into this idea, but if you’ve read this far, you must like the concept.

              The next step is to calculate what sort of income you can expect from those new clients. Don’t forget to factor in your expenses associated with this new business. Let’s keep it real and be conservative.

              Now balance that with the cost of hiring a ghostwriter. Plan for the project to take you a year or more to complete then add in another six months to a year to publish and market your work. Give yourself time. It’s not an overnight process.

              If you’re ahead financially after five years, is that a promising investment for you?

              If not, consider writing a shorter book. Most ghostwriters charge by the word, so that will cut down on costs.

              So, what did you decide?

              If you’ve determined to use good business sense and want to reach out and hire a ghostwriter, please email me. I’m interested in hearing from you, learning about your project. Please include your budget and time line, so that I can fully understand your needs.

              Invest in yourself and others will be more likely to invest in you!

              I’m telling you, entrepreneurs can be great authors!