Calling All Entrepreneurs! Imagine Publishing a Book to Win Clients.

Let me be clear, I adore entrepreneurs.

You are so brilliantly unique and wonderfully essential to our society. We need more of you in our world, continually enriching us with your creativity and productivity.

I’m fully aware that you live and breathe your product or service. You give of yourself wholeheartedly and rarely live by the clock, because you love what you do.

After talking to many self-created business owners, I understand the challenge involved with building a client base. There are many techniques, but success always seems to boil down to entering the tricky world of sales.

Let’s be real, what entrepreneur can make a living while attempting to elude sales?

It’s safe to say that you must bite the bullet and embrace the inner salesman within you.

Now, please don’t get me wrong. I’m not taking about becoming a greedy, aggressive, pushy person who tries to force things on people they don’t honestly need. No, I’m talking about honing the intricate art of interesting people in the product or service that you provide.

That’s where ghostwriters come in.

That’s where I come in.

How many potential clients could you interest if you authored a well-written book about your niche-market expertise?

“Well, Mrs. Prospect, funny you should ask. The fact is, I wrote the book on that subject!”

There are only a few things that impress people more than this. And it holds true for so many types of business. Whether you’re selling gluten-free cupcakes or specializing in commercial real estate, do you agree that you can draw in more clients if you’re a published author on the subject?

Chances are, if you are a successful entrepreneur, you could write this book yourself. You have the necessary talent and creative ability, but let’s be realistic…

Do you have the time to write your book yourself?

Writing a book takes hundreds of hours. That’s why most successful entrepreneurs find it cost effective to hire a ghostwriter.

The next question becomes: Am I able to afford to hire a professional writer?

Only you can answer that question!

Basically, as with any business decision, it comes down to finances.

The first step, the first calculation, involves figuring out how many new clients you’ll receive when you author a book. If you hand your book to a prospect, they’re more likely to become a client. Bottom line, you’re certain to gain credibility and earn respect, which should translate to new business.

I’m not here to talk you into this idea, but if you’ve read this far, you must like the concept.

The next step is to calculate what sort of income you can expect from those new clients. Don’t forget to factor in your expenses associated with this new business. Let’s keep it real and be conservative.

Now balance that with the cost of hiring a ghostwriter, $40,000 for a 200-page book. Plan for the project to take you a year or more to complete then add in another six months to a year to publish and market your work. Give yourself time. It’s not an overnight process.

If you’re ahead financially after five years, is that a promising investment for you?

If not, consider writing a shorter book. Most ghostwriters charge by the word, so that will cut down on costs.

So, what did you decide?

If you’ve determined it is a wise business plan to reach out and hire a ghostwriter, please email me. I’m interested in hearing from you, learning about your project. Please include your budget and time line, so that I can fully understand your needs.

Invest in yourself and others will be more likely to invest in you!

 

Why You Should Become an Author

After talking to many people, it seems clear that most want to write at least one book within their lifetime. It makes sense! For some, it’s a burning passion that can only be satisfied by completing the goal. Just thinking about the idea or being stuck in the middle of a book project is very unfulfilling, isn’t it?

Most people don’t desire to write a book because they crave fame and fortune. Instead, it’s more like they have something important to say and want to share that message with an audience, whether it be their memoir, useful information in their particular field, or a just fantastical story. Many people have a communication they wish heard.

However, while most everyone has something to say, many don’t have the time or skills necessary to put a book together.

That’s where I come in. As a ghostwriter, it’s my job to do what I can to help.

I speak from experience when I say that you will gain a sense of pride and self-confidence that’s unparalleled when you publish your first book. There’s nothing like seeing your name in print and getting reviews of praise from readers.

If you decide to tackle your book project yourself, my advice is to write from the heart and focus on helping others through your message. Your book will stay with readers long after they’ve finished it, influencing their lives and the lives of those they talk to about your book.

Perhaps you’ve already started on your book, but haven’t been able to finish it due to time constraints or writer’s block. Whatever the reason, don’t give up! You’ll run the risk of leaving an important life goal hanging in limbo, not to mention all the lives that could have been influenced through your message.

If you’re reading my blog, you’re most likely one of the many people who yearn to see their words in print, to see their name on a book cover. If so, then I urge you to find a way to complete your book. Too many people let the dream of being an author go unfulfilled.

I’ve ghostwritten nearly twenty books and have personally authored one, Chess Is Child’s Play – Teaching Techniques That Work. When I receive notes from readers about my book, it brightens my day tremendously. There’s nothing else like it! It’s wonderfully rewarding.

Whether you’re just getting started or already several chapters deep, if you find yourself stuck, let me know! I’d like to help in any way I can, be it offering writing tips and tricks, helping with self-publishing, editing or proofreading, or taking on your book project to free up your time. I have a large network of talented writers, editors, and proofreaders and can help find the perfect match for you.

Feel free to email me any time. I’m here to help!

Additional articles you might find helpful:

How Much Does It Cost To Hire A Ghostwriter?

Should I Write and Publish My Memoir?

Questions for a Ghostwriter

It’s Good Business to Write a Book!

Four Different Ghostwriting Methods

What You Need in a Ghostwriting Contract

Ghostwriting ContractIt’s always a good idea to have a contract with your ghostwriter. That way you and the writer know what to expect and there can’t be misunderstandings down the line.

If you’re a professional writer, I highly recommend you hire a lawyer to create a good basic template that you can adjust depending on the parameters of a particular project. It’s well worth the cost to make sure your contract says what you think it says!

While some projects are so small they don’t really require a contract, it’s still a good idea to put everything you agree on in writing in some fashion. An email can sometime suffice.

As you put together your contract template, here are a few basic components to consider:

Dates

The first paragraph of my contract includes my name and the name of the client, as well as the effective date of the contract. Later, I include the four major milestones, along with their deadlines.

The four milestones I use are:

• The completion of the outline.

• The first half of the first draft.

• The completion of the first draft.

• The final manuscript.

Price

Because I use four milestones, I like to break up the payments into four parts. My policy is to be paid ahead of the writing, but you can come to any sort of agreement that works for you.

Set the total price for the service then include the payments for each segment in your contract. For instance, if your total price is $30,000, the compensation for each segment would be $7,500, if you use my four milestone approach.

Expected Length

Most ghostwriters charge on a per word basis, so the contract should specify how many words the author should expect to receive. Most clients think in terms of pages, but that can change depending on the font style and size chosen. I like to include the agreed-upon word count along with a rough page estimate for clarity.

It’s a good rule of thumb to consider that there are 250 words per page, so a 200 page manuscript should run about 50,000 words.

A Description of the Project

If possible, you might include the genre or a rough description of the book in the contract, along with the title. This description doesn’t need to be long.

Ghostwriter Services

It’s important to mention the specifics of the service expected. For instance, as a ghostwriter, I can’t promise that the book will be published. I also don’t create the cover design or work on layout. I also don’t provide illustrations or photographs.

My job is to create a well-written manuscript that is as error free as I can get it. I work with a few proofreaders and editors to produce an as near-perfect product as possible. I think it’s important to have a number of eyes review the final document before turning it over to the client.

Copyrights

It’s important to address copyright issues, making it clear that the client will own all the rights to the final work. They are the author. It’s their book and they can publish it in any form they desire. As a ghostwriter, I own no claim or rights to the work.

Revisions

It’s to be expected that the client will have revisions for the ghostwriter as pieces are submitted. However, if the number of revision requests isn’t specified, the process can be endless.

Personally, I allow the client one set of revisions per milestone, but will of course make minor revisions along the way. Since we always work off of a detailed outline, there shouldn’t be any drastic changes during the revision process.

Confidentiality

Sometimes a client requires confidentiality because of the nature of the project. Perhaps the ideas are unique and cutting edge or the author simply doesn’t want anyone to know he or she had help writing their book. If this is the case for your project, include a confidentiality clause within the contract.

Things That Could Go Wrong

Most likely everything will go smoothly throughout the process, but it’s always good to put in a clause covering what happens if one party wants to terminate the agreement prematurely.

In addition, consider limiting the damages and agreeing to arbitration to resolve all disputes.

A ghostwriting contract is something you’ll need for any large project. It shouldn’t be taken lightly as it could save you from unnecessary headaches in the future. If you have any questions or concerns, please consult a lawyer. It’s worth the investment!

Additional articles you might find helpful:

It’s Good Business to Write a Book

How Much Does It Cost To Hire A Ghostwriter?

What Do I Need to Start with a Ghostwriter?

A Ghostwriter’s Fee: How Do They Charge?

Eight Reasons Why You Should Write a Book

It’s Good Business to Write a Book

How to Write a Business Book and Why You Should!

how to write a business bookIf you’re a business owner, an entrepreneur, you should have a book with your name on it. Figuring out how to write a business book should be part of your branding strategy.

Of course, it needs to be a well-written book, which benefits the reader with helpful ideas. Your book should also flow well, be interesting and entertaining to read, and contain personal anecdotes, as well as a touch of humor whenever appropriate. Sometimes, you’ll want to give your reader assignments, things they can do to apply the information you’re giving them.

When considering how to write a business book, write to your reader. You’ll need to determine who that is and what attributes they have. Usually, your readers would be peers in your industry or those wanting to break into your industry.

One tip I can share is to make sure to use vocabulary your readers will understand. If you need to use terms that maybe unfamiliar to your readers, define each word as you use it, so the reader doesn’t have to look them up. Most won’t and they’ll get lost in the jargon and likely won’t continue reading.

You might be wondering how writing your own book will help you with your business.

Mike Schultz, president of the Wellesley Hills Group and well-known consultant in marketing, surveyed 200 authors of business books and discovered that 96% had a positive impact on their business from writing a book. That doesn’t surprise me. It just makes sense!

Do you know an author of a business book? If so, ask them if they found being a published author beneficial in their line of work. And would they recommend that you also write a book about your niche market.

Some people ask if they will make a profit on their business book. It’s a valid question.

 

The answer is maybe, but that really isn’t the point. A business book will help you to generate leads and then close them. Add to that, many published authors find they can charge clients higher prices. Being a published author gives a certain credibility and fame to you and your business you wouldn’t otherwise have.

Here are some other ideas on how you can leverage your book:

  • Expand your business to include consulting colleagues in your industry.
  • Book yourself to do public-speaking events or seminars.
  • Create online courses.

There are many ways you can make money indirectly through your book. How you channel this resource is only limited by your creativity.

Keep in mind that with a book bearing your name, it will give you instant credibility. Not only will your personal title change to include author, but you will also be recognized as an expert in your field.

Of course, the caveat to all this is that your book must be well-written. A poorly written book would backfire and could cause more harm than good.

Unfortunately, you can’t simply hire an editor to make sure the grammar and punctuation is acceptable. You must have a good book, with important well-thought out information presented within.

Please don’t just regurgitate another author’s work and call it your own. You must have a unique voice and something important to say. Most people need a professional to interview them to help determine what their focus should be.

That’s where I come in.

Many have an inkling of how to proceed with their book, but find the project overwhelming. Business professionals usually know that they need a book, but have no time (or desire) to write it themselves. I’m passionate about helping people create an engaging book with useful information that readers can’t put down.

Do you have a business book in mind? If so, please contact me and share your idea. I’m here to help!

Additional articles you might find helpful:

How Much Does It Cost To Hire A Ghostwriter?

Is Ghostwriting Ethical?

A Ghostwriter’s Fee: How Do They Charge?

Working With A Ghostwriter – What Steps Should You Take?

Why Should I Hire a Ghostwriter?

 

Is Ghostwriting Ethical?

UniverseI’ve been a ghostwriter for over ten years now and love it. However, I do get a varied response when people hear that I write books for other people. A typical conversation might go:

“So you’re telling me that you write the book, but someone else gets all the credit?”

“That’s right.”

“But how is that fair?”

“I’m fine with it. Really, I am.”

“But, is it really ethical?”

Now, that’s a good question, one worthy of a blog article.

I feel strongly that ghostwriting other people’s books is ethical, or I wouldn’t be in this line of work. The way I see it, I’m helping people achieve their dreams by getting their books published. If they can’t write the book themselves, why not hire someone to help them?

However, like all ethical questions, it is a personal judgment call. Even though I feel strongly about my opinion, I can also see the other viewpoint. In the end, you must decide if ghostwriter is an ethical choice for you.

Maybe it would help to know that ghostwriting is a common practice. There are a lot of published authors who had help writing their books. Some just had a kernel of an idea then handed it over to a pro who wrote the book for them. It’s an accepted practice in this industry.

Now, if I wrote a book and someone came along and stole it, claiming it was theirs, that would be plagiarism. That’s definitely unethical and very illegal.

So, how is this different?

Well, for one thing, I always have a contract with my clients, an agreement right from the start that says that I will write their book for them, but that they will own all the rights to the book.

This agreement is not unlike others that exist in various fields. For example, large companies hire employees to write software programs or design equipment for them, asking them to assign the rights to them once the project is complete.

On the flipside, some writers I know will not work as ghostwriters because they feel it isn’t right. Other authors will not put their name on a book unless they wrote every word themselves. I admire anyone who sticks with their decision, who is unwilling to be swayed by popular opinion.

How do you feel about this point? Is it ethical for an author to hire a ghostwriter to write their book for them? I’d like to hear your opinion!

Additional articles you might find helpful:

How Much Does It Cost To Hire A Ghostwriter?

Why Should I Hire a Ghostwriter?

Seven Tips For Writing A Great Memoir

A Ghostwriter’s Fee: How Do They Charge?

Working With A Ghostwriter – What Steps Should You Take?

 

 

A Ghostwriter’s Fee: How Do They Charge?

“How does a ghostwriter get paid?”

This is a question many people have. There seems to be a mystery about the subject, so I thought I’d tackle it for you.

A ghostwriter’s fee can be calculated in a few ways. It depends on the project, but here are some methods:

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  • Hourly: This is how I started, because many professionals charge by the hour. However, for writing, it isn’t always terribly practical. Most clients want to know how much a project will cost. They don’t want to be caught off guard. Today, I do sometimes charge on an hourly basis, when it makes sense, such as for a consulting fee. My hourly fee is $145 per hour, but the range I’ve seen amongst other professionals is $65 to $250 per hour.
  • Per page: I’ve never charged on a per page basis, but know that some writers do. It is hard to calculate because the word count per page really depends on the page layout and font used. On average, you can consider that there are 250 words per page, so it is possible to make this calculation.
  • Per word: Having tried a number of methods, this is the one I like best. There is no room for doubt or question. Researching prices, the range I’ve seen  professional writers charge is $0.25 to $3 per word. Personally, I charge a dollar per word.
  • Per project: When I bid on a book, I usually bid on the project, but base it on the number of words the client anticipates the work to be. For a full length book, I would charge anywhere from $40,000 to $60,000. The price will depend on how much research and interviewing will be required. If someone has 300 pages of notes, requiring less research on my part, I’d probably charge the lower figure. After talking to several ghostwriters, I have seen the range be anywhere from $15,000 to $150,000 for a non-celebrity book. The price for celebrity books goes much higher.

There are other incentives you can offer your ghostwriter, in order to negotiate the best price. Here are a few you might consider:

  • A percentage of the back end: Never ask a professional ghostwriter to work solely for a percentage of the back end (royalties). It’s not something a reputable writer would do. However, a student, who wishes to gain experience, might jump at such an offer. I will sometimes work out a deal where I get a percentage of sales on top of my fee, but in those cases, I agree to help with marketing and promotional ideas. These are not within the purview of a typical ghostwriter, but I love working on this aspect of projects.
  • A cover credit: Most often my clients do not want to share the cover credit with me. They prefer that I remain a ghost in the process. Some will give me a quiet acknowledgment on the opening pages, but others ask me never to share that I had anything to do with the book. That is their right, one I respect fully. However, some will offer me the coveted “with” credit on the cover (one given to some ghostwriters). It lets the world know the author hired me to ghostwrite for them.

In addition, it is always nice to present your ghostwriter with a written testimonial at the end of the project. I have gathered a collection now, which you can see on my testimonial page.

Please feel free to email me anytime with questions. I know this area can be confusing. I’m here to help!

Additional articles you might find helpful:

Hire a Ghostwriter to Record Your Family History for Future Generations

I Want to Hire a Ghostwriter, but Don’t Have Any Money!

It’s Good Business to Write a Book

Four Different Ghostwriting Methods

What You Need in a Ghostwriting Contract

How Much Does It Cost to Hire a Ghostwriter?

How to Become a Ghostwriter

If you are interested in becoming a ghostwriter, I can offer you a free 20 minute consultation, which will get you started. Contact me today for a special introductory package!

I was recently asked to speak about how I became a successful ghostwriter. Enjoy this radio interview:

Listen to internet radio with Help 2 Succeed on Blog Talk Radio

Calculating Your First Ghostwriting Bid

RambergMediaImages /Free Photos

“I want to be a writer. What should I do?”

I hear this a lot!

It is one of my personal goals to always encourage people to pursue their dreams. We need more writers in the world. Writing is not only a channel of communication, but it is also an art form!

Mostly though, when someone asks this, they want to make money as a writer. Again, I say GREAT! However, it’s good to prepare a bit.

If you have limited experience (perhaps you have only worked on school projects or written as a hobby), you need to gain more experience. It is a little different writing for another person, under their name, with deadlines that you don’t personally set. Writing as a job is not the same as writing as a hobby.

Finding your first client is your first challenge. It is the old problem of how do you gain experience when people only want to hire writers with experience? The answer is that you must become a sales person (sorry, I’m just being honest). You must sell yourself!

Once you have had one major paid writing assignment under your belt, finding the second is easier. The third is even easier. Finally you get to a threshold where people seek you out and fight to have you write for them. It all starts with getting that first paid gig.

So, how do you start? Talk to everyone you know and everyone you meet. Tell them that you’re a writer. Most writers tend to be bashful about this point. They don’t want to “toot their own horn.” Well, I’m here to tell you that you need to toot away. Don’t be shy about sharing your passion for writing, your ability, your love for the field. Your enthusiasm will attract clients.

Not everyone you talk to will hire you. Most won’t. But if you talk to enough, you will find your first client (and might even get two or three projects).

You won’t be able to charge top dollar for that first job, but you must charge enough to make it worth your while. Don’t allow someone to take advantage of you.

Here’s a basic formula for figuring out a bid for a client:

  1. Calculate how many hours it will take you to write the book (most likely 100 to 200 hours for a 200 to 300 page book).
  2. Figure out how much you’d like to make per hour (please do not accept less than $20 an hour).
  3. Multiply the two. For example, say you feel it will take you 150 hours to write their book and you’d like to make $30 an hour, you’d have a figure of $4500 at this stage.
  4. Ask questions, talk to the client and get a feel for various factors. How do they communicate? Do they write well? Will they provide all the information or will you have to do most of the research yourself?
  5. Add or subtract from the above figure, taking these factors into account. For instance if you see they don’t respond to emails and phone messages immediately, know that this will add time for you. In this case, raise your price a bit. Or if they write very well and respond quickly, you might reduce your fees, as they will help you to write the book.
  6. Now, add in a buffer, which will take into account a miscalculation in one of the above steps.
  7. If someone referred the business to you, add in something for them. I always include a 10% referral fee. I like to reward people who send business my way.

This is a good starting point. It will give you an idea of what you should charge for your first project.

If you ever want to bounce a bid off of me, please feel free to email me. I can help you sort out the correct price point!

Three Ways to Avoid Being Scammed by a Publisher

Today I asked Donna Erickson to share her thoughts on self-publishing. Donna is the author of No-Hassle Publishing: An Author’s Guide to Today’s Changing Industry and the owner of aflairforwriting.com, a writing/editing/and publishing service. She has 25 years of experience in the industry, and her company offers a full array of quality services for authors who are self-publishing.

By Donna J. Erickson

Many new authors are opting to self-publish their print books and e-books because it’s much quicker and easier than trying to break into traditional publishing. Self-publishing also allows the author to have more control–especially in the areas of cover design and publication title. When new authors begin exploring their options, they often conduct an online search for companies offering self-publishing services, which leads us to this critical question: Are the most popular listings for self-publishing companies on the Internet necessarily the best?

The answer to that question is “no.” The companies on the top of the list have simply paid the most to appear there. These companies pay top-dollar to pay-per-click search engines to get to the top of the list. Does that make them better than the others? Absolutely not! They are just paying more money per click to have you visit their site.

In fact, some of these big-name companies (also known as vanity presses) have been sued and found liable for not delivering what was promised. And many authors have brought their nightmare stories to Internet discussions. So how can you avoid becoming the next casualty? Here are some red-flag suggestions on what to watch out for:

  • Beware of Offshore Affiliates

Many of the big names outsource their customer service to the Philippines, India, and other remote locations. Authors have complained that these individuals are often not knowledgeable, inaccessible, and hard to understand. This could be a sign you’re headed for trouble. A credible company should have in-house services with a qualified and helpful staff to assist you. Some companies may have in-house customer service that disappears once they have your money. Try to get feedback from other authors who have done business with them before you give them your money.

  • Beware of Poor Quality Editing

All editors are not alike. A less-than-reputable company will hire inexperienced editors who will work for low pay. I’ve heard of an instance where an author ended up with more mistakes after the editing process! Find out about your editor’s background, location, and level of experience. Ask to see a before-and-after sample edit. If they refuse, walk away.

  • Beware of Inflated Pricing

Like any major purchase, you need to shop around. If Company A can provide the same services as Company B, why are they priced twice as high? Company A may not care about you or your book. They may just want your money. Some of these outfits are really not about publishing books; they are only about making money. If a company accepts any manuscript–rather than being selective in their process–that sounds like a scam.

Before you give any money to a publisher, make sure you research their background and policies–especially on contracts and refunds. For more detailed information, you can read my book, “No-Hassle Publishing: An Author’s Guide to Today’s Changing Industry.” I’ve uncovered some facts that could save you a lot of grief. Read actual testimonials from other authors. Check discussion boards and join social media groups (such as LinkedIn and Facebook) for comments and feedback. You don’t want to become the next victim with a “horror story” to share about vanity presses.

 

How Much Does It Cost To Hire A Ghostwriter?

hiring a ghost writerBy far, the number one question I hear the most is, “How much does it cost to hire a ghostwriter?” It is also one of the most searched for questions on the net. I always like to address this upfront, so that people aren’t left wondering.

The answer to this question really depends upon a few factors:

  • What do you want written?
  • What is your deadline?
  • How long is the piece?
  • How much do you value the quality of the writing?

The cost to hire a ghostwriter fluctuates greatly from person to person, but I can promise you, you get what you pay for!

It’s a good idea to propose a trial when working with a ghostwriter for the first time. You will need to pay for the service, of course, but in the end you’ll own the rights to the piece and can use it anytime.

I charge a dollar per word to ghostwrite. In the trial phase I allow the client to pick the word count and charge accordingly. If someone is writing  their memoirs, I might select a story from their lives and write it for them. Some clients ask me to write an essay or a blog article. Those few pages give a new client a good idea of what he or she can expect. And it allows me to gauge what pricing will make sense for the whole project.

WARNING: A lowball offer to write your book can sound attractive, but it is dangerous. I have met a number of prospective clients who made “excellent” deals hoping to save money, only to find they had to spend a lot more to have everything re-written. It’s frustrating for them and frustrating to the ghostwriter who has to take over the project. The client is usually not a happy camper. Every now and then you can luck out and find a writer who doesn’t know their true worth, but for the most part, you will get poor writing when you pay cheap rates.

Writers for hire fall into three main categories: cheap writers, mid-range professional writers, and high-end celebrity writers. The following is the best detailed answer I can give about the cost to hire a ghostwriter to write a full-length book:

  • Cheap writers can be found who will write a 100 to 200 page book for as little as $2,000. If this is your budget (and you’re a gambler by nature), your best bet is to find a student new to the industry. Please be careful that he or she is actually writing your book and not plagiarizing another writer’s work.
  • Professional writers will usually charge between $12,000 and $90,000 to write a 100 to 300 page book. This price varies depending on the writer’s level of expertise and the amount of work required for the project.
  • High-end celebrity writers are usually hired by actors, politicians, musicians and other famous personalities who will sell books just by virtue of their name. The writers for these celebrities are well-established authors with a lot of experience. They can charge $150,000 to $750,000 for a book. Sometimes more.

Most people recognize that they would like a mid-ranged professional writer. It’s a reasonable budget range for most people. A lot of time, energy and hard work goes into writing a book. An excellent professional writer will often spend up to a year researching, writing and editing a book for you. If you’re paying a fraction of the usual price, you often get a fraction of the quality.

If you have questions and need help, please don’t hesitate to contact me!

Additional articles you might find helpful:

Hire a Ghostwriter to Record Your Family History for Future Generations

It’s Good Business to Write a Book!

Four Different Ghostwriting Methods

Eight Reasons Why You Should Write A Book

What You Need in a Ghostwriting Contract

What Is the Difference Between a Ghostwriter, an Editor, a Proofreader and a Publisher

 

“When my partner and I decided to write a book, we interviewed many ghost writers. Some were very inexpensive, while others were too pricey for our budget. Laura wasn’t the least expensive writer, but we chose her because she was so passionate about writing. Laura went above and beyond our expectations. I am very pleased with all her work and will continue to use her for my future writing needs.” Edwin Carrion