It’s Good Business to Write a Book

How to Write a Business Book and Why You Should!

how to write a business bookIf you’re a business owner, an entrepreneur, you should have a book with your name on it. Figuring out how to write a business book should be part of your branding strategy.

Of course, it needs to be a well-written book, which benefits the reader with helpful ideas. Your book should also flow well, be interesting and entertaining to read, and contain personal anecdotes, as well as a touch of humor whenever appropriate. Sometimes, you’ll want to give your reader assignments, things they can do to apply the information you’re giving them.

When considering how to write a business book, write to your reader. You’ll need to determine who that is and what attributes they have. Usually, your readers would be peers in your industry or those wanting to break into your industry.

One tip I can share is to make sure to use vocabulary your readers will understand. If you need to use terms that maybe unfamiliar to your readers, define each word as you use it, so the reader doesn’t have to look them up. Most won’t and they’ll get lost in the jargon and likely won’t continue reading.

You might be wondering how writing your own book will help you with your business.

Mike Schultz, president of the Wellesley Hills Group and well-known consultant in marketing, surveyed 200 authors of business books and discovered that 96% had a positive impact on their business from writing a book. That doesn’t surprise me. It just makes sense!

Do you know an author of a business book? If so, ask them if they found being a published author beneficial in their line of work. And would they recommend that you also write a book about your niche market.

Some people ask if they will make a profit on their business book. It’s a valid question.

 

The answer is maybe, but that really isn’t the point. A business book will help you to generate leads and then close them. Add to that, many published authors find they can charge clients higher prices. Being a published author gives a certain credibility and fame to you and your business you wouldn’t otherwise have.

Here are some other ideas on how you can leverage your book:

  • Expand your business to include consulting colleagues in your industry.
  • Book yourself to do public-speaking events or seminars.
  • Create online courses.

There are many ways you can make money indirectly through your book. How you channel this resource is only limited by your creativity.

Keep in mind that with a book bearing your name, it will give you instant credibility. Not only will your personal title change to include author, but you will also be recognized as an expert in your field.

Of course, the caveat to all this is that your book must be well-written. A poorly written book would backfire and could cause more harm than good.

Unfortunately, you can’t simply hire an editor to make sure the grammar and punctuation is acceptable. You must have a good book, with important well-thought out information presented within.

Please don’t just regurgitate another author’s work and call it your own. You must have a unique voice and something important to say. Most people need a professional to interview them to help determine what their focus should be.

That’s where I come in.

Many have an inkling of how to proceed with their book, but find the project overwhelming. Business professionals usually know that they need a book, but have no time (or desire) to write it themselves. I’m passionate about helping people create an engaging book with useful information that readers can’t put down.

Do you have a business book in mind? If so, please contact me and share your idea. I’m here to help!

Additional articles you might find helpful:

How Much Does It Cost To Hire A Ghostwriter?

Is Ghostwriting Ethical?

A Ghostwriter’s Fee: How Do They Charge?

Working With A Ghostwriter – What Steps Should You Take?

Why Should I Hire a Ghostwriter?

 

How to Write a Memoir

how to write a memoirIf you have been wondering how to write a memoir, here are a few helpful tips. A memoir is creative nonfiction, which allows a reader to step into the shoes of the author and experience their life as they did. It shouldn’t be a dry account of a series of incidents, but a passionate retelling of a personal journey.

Virginia Wolf said it best in her autobiographical essay “A Sketch of the Past”: “The reason so many memoirs fail is that they focus on the events or what happened and leave out the person to whom things happened.”

In order to accomplish the goal of putting the reader in the middle of the action, you really need to use the first person. This allows the reader to feel like the author is telling their story to them directly. Of course, I’m sure there are exceptions and it might even be possible to write a memoir in the second person, but it’s best to tell your story in the first.

Is it a memoir or an autobiography?

Some writers will tell you that you can use memoir and autobiography interchangeably. And some would shoot me for saying that. People get very passionate about the subject.

If we dissect the difference, an autobiography is usually less personal and focuses on the complete chronological life of a person, whereas a memoir focuses on a specific event or time period.

Any autobiography can be similar in feel to a biography, just written by the author as opposed to a third party. It’s often more factual and historical in nature, whereas a memoir tends to be emotional.

Although memoirs are classified as nonfiction, they follow many of the same rules as fiction. For instance, dialogue is key to a good memoir. As with a novel, the conversations between characters help move the story forward. Also, even though one writes in the first person, the writer’s axiom of show, don’t tell applies well.

Is it a memoir or a diary?

A diary is yet another style of telling your life story. One classic example is The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank. It is a book that tracks a segment of someone’s life through entries written on specific dates.

The format of a journal entry, where you are really having a conversation with yourself, doesn’t often work as a memoir. Anne Frank’s diary would be an example of one that did work well (although some may say it wasn’t a memoir).

In the end, it really doesn’t matter much what you call the style of your book, as long as it communicates to others and allows them a peek into your life. Consider your message and tie that thread through the tapestry of your story. Perhaps your readers will improve their lives as a result.

Additional articles you might find helpful:

How To Write A Nonfiction Book

Seven Tips For Writing A Great Memoir

A Ghostwriter’s Fee: How Do They Charge?

Working With A Ghostwriter – What Steps Should You Take?

How Much Does It Cost To Hire A Ghostwriter?

Should I Fictionalize My Memoir?

cartoon my lifeMost of the ghostwriting requests I get are from people who want to share their life story. They often say, “I’ve been told by many friends that I should write a book!” Sometimes their friends are right, sometimes not, but it’s a good indication if many people are pushing you in that direction.

At some stage in the process a person consider writing a book will decide it’s time to pick up the phone and ask for advice from a professional.

Once a person has decided to write their memoir, one of the first questions they face is, “Should I fictionalize my memoir?”

That’s a good question! And as you might guess, the answer really depends on you and your project.

It’s always more appealing to readers to learn that a story is completely true. People love stepping into the author’s shoes for that brief moment. However, there are reasons why you might not be able to stick to the complete truth.

So, what do you do? Be honest or creative?

Are you in the middle of this internal debate? If so, here are a few reasons why you might choose to fictionalize your memoir:

  1. Bluntly, your story just isn’t interesting enough. I tend to be rather straightforward, so I apologize if I’ve offended you. It’s just that there are stories that are fascinating and others which might make a good short story, or as a fellow ghostwriter and good friend of mine would say, “That sounds like a newspaper article!” If you need to add some content and pizzazz, consider turning your book into a novel that’s just based on your life story.
  2. You’d really like to add in a space ship or two. There are times when you might like to alter history a bit. Most fictionalized memoirs don’t enter the realm of science fiction, but there might be a few tales you wish to add to your story, which never really happened.
  3. Your family would never speak to you again if you aired your dirty laundry. It’s easy to disguise most people’s identities in your book by simply using an alias. It is common to change names, or even just use Dr. Q. instead of Dr. Quincy, to protect the identity of a character. However, your brother is your brother and there is no way to get around that. Your family is more than likely to know whom you’re talking about if you discuss your brother, as they know him just as well as you do.
  4. You’re a stickler for details and it’s all just overwhelming. Most people fudge the facts a bit in a memoir, not worrying if Grand Central Station was truly crowded on Christmas Eve back in 1965. It’s hard to remember such a minor detail and the small handful of people that do probably won’t make a ruckus if you get it wrong. Still, if some of these facts are important to you and you don’t want to worry about getting them all correct, why not turn your memoir into a novel?

Of course, in the end the decision to fictionalize your memoir is up to you. If you have a fascinating story, one that works as is, keep it nonfiction. When you can keep the real timeline in tact and still have a fascinating story, it’s the best course of action.

Still unsure? Feel free to give me a email me if you need a sounding board!

Additional articles you might find helpful:

How Much Does It Cost To Hire A Ghostwriter?

Seven Tips For Writing A Great Memoir

A Ghostwriter’s Fee: How Do They Charge?

Working With A Ghostwriter – What Steps Should You Take?

 

Is Ghostwriting Ethical?

UniverseI’ve been a ghostwriter for over ten years now and love it. However, I do get a varied response when people hear that I write books for other people. A typical conversation might go:

“So you’re telling me that you write the book, but someone else gets all the credit?”

“That’s right.”

“But how is that fair?”

“I’m fine with it. Really, I am.”

“But, is it really ethical?”

Now, that’s a good question, one worthy of a blog article.

I feel strongly that ghostwriting other people’s books is ethical, or I wouldn’t be in this line of work. The way I see it, I’m helping people achieve their dreams by getting their books published. If they can’t write the book themselves, why not hire someone to help them?

However, like all ethical questions, it is a personal judgment call. Even though I feel strongly about my opinion, I can also see the other viewpoint. In the end, you must decide if ghostwriter is an ethical choice for you.

Maybe it would help to know that ghostwriting is a common practice. There are a lot of published authors who had help writing their books. Some just had a kernel of an idea then handed it over to a pro who wrote the book for them. It’s an accepted practice in this industry.

Now, if I wrote a book and someone came along and stole it, claiming it was theirs, that would be plagiarism. That’s definitely unethical and very illegal.

So, how is this different?

Well, for one thing, I always have a contract with my clients, an agreement right from the start that says that I will write their book for them, but that they will own all the rights to the book.

This agreement is not unlike others that exist in various fields. For example, large companies hire employees to write software programs or design equipment for them, asking them to assign the rights to them once the project is complete.

On the flipside, some writers I know will not work as ghostwriters because they feel it isn’t right. Other authors will not put their name on a book unless they wrote every word themselves. I admire anyone who sticks with their decision, who is unwilling to be swayed by popular opinion.

How do you feel about this point? Is it ethical for an author to hire a ghostwriter to write their book for them? I’d like to hear your opinion!

Additional articles you might find helpful:

How Much Does It Cost To Hire A Ghostwriter?

Why Should I Hire a Ghostwriter?

Seven Tips For Writing A Great Memoir

A Ghostwriter’s Fee: How Do They Charge?

Working With A Ghostwriter – What Steps Should You Take?

 

 

Seven Tips For Writing A Memoir

writing a memoirUsing my crystal ball, I predict that a number of you are thinking about the book you’ve been wanting to write. Perhaps it’s writing a memoir. If so, here are some tips you consider:

Give yourself time. Writing a book isn’t an overnight process. Although it might be possible to complete a book in a month or two, or even if you have nothing else on your plate and you’re an experienced writer, there is no need to rush things. Give yourself six to eight months, setting daily targets. Your book will be better for it.

Remember to give yourself a few character flaws. It’s tempting to embellish your life story and write your book from the perspective of a superhero, without any non-optimum personality traits. The problem is the rest of us, who have flaws, will never be able to relate. So, include the mistakes, the error in judgments, along with your amazing feats and your story will be more relatable and inspiring.

Humor goes a long way. Adding humor to your story can make it more enjoyable and memorable to read. While it is best not to make fun of others in your book, there are still plenty of other ways to include humor. For instance, funny dialogue snippets lighten the mood nicely. There might be times when you can delve into an absurd moment and expand on it, shining a spotlight on certain aspects that might make others laugh out loud.

Write and write and write. If you’re choosing to write your memoir yourself, you’ll need to write on a regular basis. Don’t expect to make much progress if you only type a few pages on the weekends. Most writers write daily. Although it isn’t a requirement, it does help keep the ideas flowing.

Feel free to embellish details. It isn’t realistic to expect that you’ll remember every single little detail of your life perfectly. For example, what did you have for breakfast on October 20th, 1974? If you’re writing a breakfast scene and want to put Eggs Benedict on the table, go ahead. Your readers will accept it. Dialogue is similar. If there is an important conversation, you would probably remember the gist of what was said, but not the exact words. And even if you did remember the exact words, you might want to change it up a bit to improve the flow. Having said that, don’t put unflattering words into the mouth of someone you’re mentioning by name. He or she might not appreciate your creativity.

Be honest. Although you’re delving into the viewpoint of one character, you, you need to have the ability to pull back from your perspective and be objective. This might mean that you don’t come out the winner of every argument, and, please don’t hit me for saying so, but you might be wrong on occasion. Be truthful about all of it. It’s possible that your reader might learn a lesson and avoid making the same mistakes you did.

Read other memoirs. It’s hard to write a good memoir if you’ve never read one by another writer. Reading a lot will help you learn about what works and what doesn’t.

If you want to write your memoir, start writing and continue writing until your first draft is completed. Don’t edit, just write. Enjoy the experience. Writing memoirs is one of my favorite projects! It’s so rewarding. I get to meet new people and help them share their life stories with others.

Additional articles you might find helpful:

How To Write A Nonfiction Book

Why Should I Hire a Ghostwriter?

A Ghostwriter’s Fee: How Do They Charge?

Working With A Ghostwriter – What Steps Should You Take?

How Much Does It Cost To Hire A Ghostwriter?

When You Shouldn’t Write Your Memoir

Woman_with_a_rough_life_checking_herself_out_in_the_mirror_(8436629921)Are you debating whether or not to write your life story? You’re not alone. I have had quite a few clients who have waffled over the same dilemma. And more often than not, I will advise people to go ahead and write down the chronological details of their past, if only for their immediate family. Recording your personal history for your children, and your children’s children, is a wonderful gift.

However, there are times when I would say you shouldn’t write your memoir. Here are a few examples that I have encountered this past year:

“I’ve lived a horrible life.” This might surprise you, but I get a ton of memoir requests from people who have lived a life of misery and despair. For instance, their childhood might have been filled with abuse then they later married another abuser, continuing the pattern. When I ask them about the purpose of their book, they usually say that it shows how one can live through anything.

While this may be a decent message for some, it isn’t really one to hammer into those who are trying to better their lives. It’s true that not every story has to have a happy ending, but most stories, particularly the memorable ones, inspire us. And it’s hard to be inspired when you’re reading such a depressing story. Most people would have no interest in picking and reading up such a book.

“I just can’t remember much.” A few times this year I received requests to write a book from people who truly can’t remember many details or stories from their past. Typically, when I interview a client I can help them remember things they never thought they could. However, if you aren’t able to remember much, it will be hard to put together your life story.

“I can’t write and I don’t have any money to hire a writer.” This is another popular comment. Though I’m not sure, I suspect these folks want me to offer to write their book for free (or for a percentage of the profits). Unfortunately, not everyone is completely upfront about their situation and will sometimes pretend they are shopping for a ghostwriter, even if they don’t ever plan to hire one. If you can’t write and can’t afford to hire someone to write it for you, your book won’t get written.

“I’d really like to get back at so-and-so.” Ah, revenge is a dish best served cold, right? Remember, though, that when you put things in writing, they are pretty permanent. You can’t take it back. It’s out there for all eternity for many readers to review over and over again. Writing a book to hurt someone else, even if you feel it is justified, is a bad idea.

“My family and close friends would kill me.” Surprisingly, this is a common fear. When I talk to most client prospects to give them advice and learn more about their projects, quite a few people have mentioned that they’re worried about hurting the feelings of loved ones. It’s a very valid concern, one that should be taken seriously. For as I mentioned earlier, once it’s in writing, it’s permanent.

As a ghostwriter, I can hide the identity of most people in your life through pseudonyms, but I can’t hide Momma or that eccentric uncle. Those close to you will know whom you’re talking about and they might not like what you have to say.

“I’ve lived a boring life, except for this one incident.” If you had, say, a near death experience, it might have been very exciting and worthy of a short story or newspaper feature article. However, if the rest of your life was relatively normal, or “boring,” most likely that one event won’t make for a good memoir.

“I don’t want everyone to know what happened to me.” Writing a memoir is like putting your personal life on display for all to see. If you are concerned about others knowing what happened to you, it’s probably not a good idea to write a book. However, I have clients who write their memoir not for the whole world to read, but rather just for their family. If even that bothers you then, well, I’m not sure what to tell you. The only way around it would be to fictionalize your story, but then it wouldn’t really be a memoir, and there’s a good chance your family and close friends would still guess that it has something to do with you.

Most of the time I encourage people to write their book, because I do feel people often have a book or two within them. However, sometimes one must be a bit flexible about the subject matter. Perhaps it isn’t your life story that you should write about, but rather a how-to book about your niche area of expertise or a science fiction novel. Whatever the case may be, I’m here to help.

Additional articles you might find helpful:

Seven Tips For Writing A Great Memoir

Why Should I Hire a Ghostwriter?

A Ghostwriter’s Fee: How Do They Charge?

Working With A Ghostwriter – What Steps Should You Take?

How Much Does It Cost To Hire A Ghostwriter?

Want To Write A Business Book?

Daintree_National_ParkAre you sitting on the fence, wondering if you should write a business book? Most likely you’d have a lot to say about your field. Perhaps you could even make a difference for others. However, I get it, your hesitation. It takes time and money to write a book.

You’re successful because you consistently put many hours into your business, every day, every week. More than likely you don’t take many vacations and you probably rarely get eig
ht hours of sleep. And if you’re anything like me, you laugh at the concept of working nine to five.

Am I right?

Okay, you don’t have a lot of spare time, but there’s no getting around the fact that you’re sitting on information that others need. Most likely you’ve created a niche market in your industry, and figured things out that others just haven’t.

So, then, when you retire, who will learn what you know? How will you pass on your knowledge? If you don’t write a book, and share your knowledge, the next generation will flounder in that particular area.

Successful business people who have specialized knowledge definitely have a responsibility to record their information, so that others can benefit. You can’t let your knowledge die with you. It just isn’t right.

When my husband and I visited the rainforest many years ago in Queensland, Australia, we took a number of guided tours. I was struck by the abundant life that grew all around us. It was thrilling! And I was particularly fascinated by the culture and knowledge of the aboriginal people. They could heal the body of most ills with the plants they found growing in the rainforest.

One tour guide told me that he was able to learn a lot from the aboriginals, but that they wouldn’t share everything with outsiders. Although I could understand their viewpoint, and respected it, I still felt sad to know that certain medicinal remedies would be lost forever as a result.

The same could be true for your business, your specialized knowledge. So, why should you share it? Why do you have an obligation to our children’s children? These are questions you really can only answer for yourself.

Still, allow me to offer some other compelling arguments to consider. For instance, wouldn’t you like to be a published author in your field? It gives you undeniable credibility with your clients and peers, not to mention, it’s a great feeling to say, “I wrote the book on that subject!”

I’m going to go out on a limb and guess that you really do want to write your book, that you do understand the urgency to share your information with others. You most likely find an indescribable joy in helping others and would like to take the next step toward seeing your book in your peers’ hands.

And I’m here to help!

However, keep in mind that come January 1st, many people will be writing me, asking for help with their books. I think writing a book is probably a top priority on many peoples’ New Year’s resolutions lists!

So, write to me now and we can talk about what you need to do to write your business book!

Additional articles you might find helpful:

How Much Does It Cost To Hire A Ghostwriter?

Seven Tips For Writing A Great Memoir

Why Should I Hire a Ghostwriter?

A Ghostwriter’s Fee: How Do They Charge?

Working With A Ghostwriter – What Steps Should You Take?

 

Writing Nonfiction- a Niche Area of Expertise

Have you developed a niche area of expertise? It could be through your day-to-day work or it might have grown from a hobby.

Do you have specialized knowledge in a particular field?

Is your way of doing things better than the norm?

Would someone be able to do a task better and more efficiently by using your method?

If you answered YES to any of these questions, you should consider writing nonfiction, a prescriptive nonfiction book, to share your knowledge with others.

writing nonfictionDefinition: A prescriptive nonfiction is a how-to book, which gives someone direction or information on a subject. It does not tell a story.

If you’re writing a prescriptive nonfiction book, here are some helpful tips to keep in mind.

Make sure to define all the industry terms. Don’t make the mistake of thinking that people will be impressed with your liberal sprinkling of hard-to-understand technical words throughout the manuscript. Clearly defining all industry jargon will allow even novice readers to understand your book. Keep it simple, so that anyone can understand!

Start with an outline. Bullet-point the important topics, which will form your table of contents.

Next, take each chapter and expand on them. Don’t write out the entire chapter now, but rather, express your thoughts in a few paragraphs of prose or further bullet-point the subheadings.

People want to hear your stories and anecdotes that complement the text, so go ahead and add a few lines into your detailed outline. You can abbreviate them, making quick notes so that you know what you’re referring to later.

Add in a few practical exercises for your readers. It’s a good idea to get people out of the mode of just reading and into action. Make sure the assignments are easy to follow and accomplish. The last thing you want to do is frustrate your reader.

When you have your detailed outline worked out, start in with one chapter. You don’t need to start at the beginning, with the first chapter. You’ll gain confidence in your book if you start with your favorite topic.

Continue to write each chapter. Remember, don’t edit as you write. Just let the words flow onto the pages.

As you progress through your first draft, you will most likely think of other things to add to your book. Simply add them into the detailed outline, adding text to existing chapters as you progress.

If you are self-publishing, your prescriptive nonfiction book can really be any length, but you’ll want to make sure you have covered your topic thoroughly. When you’re done, I highly recommend that you hire an editor to polish your manuscript and fix any typos.

Share your knowledge in your niche area of expertise with others. You’ll feel great when people write in to thank you! And if you need some help writing your book, please contact me for a free consultation.

Additional articles you might find helpful:

Seven Tips For Writing A Great Memoir

Why Should I Hire a Ghostwriter?

A Ghostwriter’s Fee: How Do They Charge?

Working With A Ghostwriter – What Steps Should You Take?

How Much Does It Cost To Hire A Ghostwriter?

Eight Reasons Why You Should Write a Book

19749453_sDo you have a book idea that you’ve been mulling over for years?

Maybe decades?

Do people routinely say to you, “You should really write a book about that!”

If so, consider taking the first steps to writing and publishing your book right now. If you have a great idea, but don’t know how to start, contact me. I can offer you advice on how to get started, guiding you as you take your first steps.

If you need a little convincing, here are eight reasons why I think it is a great idea to get your book published now:

You can say, “I wrote the book on that subject!”

If you’re an expert in a field and have valuable information to share, you should really write a book, so that others can learn from you. People are always looking for successful examples from experienced professionals in their industry. Plus, it is fun to point to a book jacket and say, “I wrote the book on that!”

There is nothing like a book for gaining credibility

Writing a book takes a lot of time, energy, and knowhow. If you complete and publish a book, people will take notice. As long as your book is well-written and contributes something to society, you will gain credibility.

You will become a published author

You will have the suffix published author attached to your name like a royal title. It’s a good calling card, regardless of what business you’re in.

You can cross off an important goal from your bucket list

Just completing a long term goal is reason enough to venture into the world of writing. It is very satisfying to have accomplished a task that has occupied so much of your attention for so long. Let’s mark it as DONE!

You will be helping others

By sharing your story or giving others your secrets of success, you will help others, people that you’ve never met. It is immensely satisfying to receive reviews and emails from others, letting you know that you have bettered their lives in some way.

A new business path could open up for you

All authors must become entrepreneurs to some degree. If you market and promote your book properly, you could make money on into the future through sales. If you’d like some tips on how to sell your book, feel free to contact me.

Once you’ve finished one book, the next one will be easier

When the first book is up on amazon.com and selling well, you will find the second book you write will probably take less time and will click into place faster. Plus, if you’ve had success with the first book, you’ll have gained a readership, who will buy your subsequent books based on your reputation.

There are many more reasons why you should write your book, but I hope I have inspired you with these eight. I can tell you that waiting for any length of time is a bad idea. Historically, the people that contact me and then put off starting their project, never actually publish a book.

If you’d like a free consultation, email me and we’ll set up a time to talk! I’d like to help you get started now!

Additional articles you might find helpful:

Seven Tips For Writing A Great Memoir

Why Should I Hire a Ghostwriter?

A Ghostwriter’s Fee: How Do They Charge?

Working With A Ghostwriter – What Steps Should You Take?

How Much Does It Cost To Hire A Ghostwriter?

I Want To Hire A Ghostwriter, But Don’t Have Any Money…

insert-life-storyUsually, I really enjoy talking to people about their book concepts. Some have very good ideas and just need help. However, occasionally there are those calls which frustrate me beyond belief. One occurred today:

I was right in the middle of the second to last chapter of a book I’m ghostwriting for a client when the phone rang. I don’t like to be interrupted while writing as it breaks the creative flow, but I worried that it might be a writer with a question, so I picked up.

“Hello?” I asked.

“Is this Laura Sherman?” the young woman demanded.

First of all, I dislike it when people don’t bother to identify themselves before asking me for my name when they call. Grrr.

“Yes, it is,” I said, letting it slide. She didn’t seem like a telephone solicitor, so it was likely she wanted to write a book.

“I found your website. I want to hire a ghostwriter to write my book, because I just don’t have the time to write it myself.”

“Great,” I said. That was a common plea. “And to whom am I speaking?”

She paused for a moment, probably weighing the pros and cons of telling me her name. “Joyce.” (Okay, that wasn’t really her name, but I’m a ghostwriter, so I can embellish.)

“Hello, Joyce,” I said. “What’s your book about?”

“My life story,” was all she offered. “I just want to know the steps involved with hiring someone to write my book.”

I gave her a brief overview of how the process works, letting her know it would probably require thirty to forty interviews, spread out over a six month period. I explained how it takes a ghostwriter hundred of hours to write a book. She asked a few more questions then got to the big one.

“So, how much will it cost?”

“I charge a dollar per word,” I said. “What’s your budget?”

“I don’t have a lot of money to spend.”

“Ah,” I said. Just what every ghostwriter wants to hear. “Well, how much did you want to spend?”

“I don’t know, maybe a thousand dollars? I know that probably isn’t enough, right?”

“Right,” I said. No one can live off a thousand dollars for six months of work, not even starving ghostwriters. “Look, I know a few editors who are looking to branch out into writing. If you’re looking to write a one-hundred page book, I could talk to one of them about maybe coming down to five thousand dollars.”

“I don’t have that kind of money.”

“Then you’ll probably need to write the book yourself,” I said. “If you did manage to find someone willing to write your book for a thousand dollars, you really might as well throw your money in the trash. It will only cost you more in the long run in revision, editing, and possibly rewriting fees.”

She then asked me what would happen after the book was written and I gave her a rundown on what an author needs to do to sell a book, such as creating and maintaining marketing websites.

“I’m not good with computers, so I can’t do any of that.”

“You’ll want to learn then,” I said. “Even if you get a publisher, you’ll need to do your own marketing. It isn’t hard, though. And I can help you when the time comes.”

Apparently, she didn’t like my answer, as she said, “So, how can I find a ghostwriter?”

“As I said, if you’re able to scrape together five thousand dollars, I can ask around for you.”

“But that would be for a good writer,” she replied. “What if I just wanted to find a writer who will do it for a thousand dollars?”

I have to admit I was speechless for a moment. Finally, I just repeated that anyone willing to write a book for a thousand dollars wasn’t someone she wanted to hire. Before I could explain that the quality of work would be so poor that she would likely have to hire a new ghostwriter and have them start over, she cut me off and said, “Okay, thank you!”

Moral of the story, if you’re serious about writing a book, you will find a way, either by hiring a good and qualified ghostwriter or by making the time to write it yourself.

Additional articles you might find helpful:

How Much Does It Cost To Hire A Ghostwriter?

Do you want to write a book about your life?

Do you need help writing a book?

Working with a Ghostwriter – What steps should you take?

How To Write A Book Proposal